Hi guys,
I hope you doing great. I'm just wondering if you can help me to get through this difficulty to understand these state verbs.

Wish,want,love,hate,like,think,taste,seem and belong.....etc

can you please explain when i can add ing?

Your understanding is highly appreciated.

Regards,
Mousa
The ing form is only used as a temporary state, so if something is a general statement then it should be in the present simple.

Like,hate,love,belong the easiest thing to say is not to use them in the ing form (despite McDonnalds adverts!)

The rest you would use to show it is a temporary period of time. I am wishing I didn't have to go to work tonight. I'm just tasting this sauce. I'm thinking about my answer.

The best way is to not to use at all in the ing form where possible.

I wish I didn't have to work tonight, I have/(am about to) tasted/(taste) this sauce. Let me think about my answer.
Anonymouscan Can you please explain when i I can add 'ing'?
The use and non-use of -ingwith stative verbs is a very big topic. The following touches on a few points you may find useful.

Verbs of sensation:

Verbs of the production of sensation: smell, taste, feel, look, sound. NO -ing.
The flower smells good.
That noise sounds like a cricket.
The stew tastes too salty.

Verbs of passive reception: smell, taste, feel, see, hear. NO -ing.
I smell something burning.
Do you taste the nutmeg in this sauce?
Paul heard the alarm bell.

Verbs of active, attentive reception: smell, taste, feel, look at, listen to.

Without -ing. Habitual.
Jane often tastes the soup as she cooks it.
We often look at those old photos.
Richard never listens to classical music.
With -ing. Action in progress.
JoAnn is smelling the flower by inhaling deeply.
Frank is feeling the carpet to decide if it will be thick enough.
The children are listening to their favorite radio program.

Special cases: Imaginary or hallucinatory sensations. -ing. see, hear.
He is seeing things.
He is hearing voices.

Verbs of bodily sensations: itch, ache, feel (a physical sensation, not a tactile sensation as above). With or without -ing. Same meaning either way.

My arm [itches / is itching].
Her head [aches / is aching].
I [don't feel / am not feeling] well this morning.

Verbs of mental activity: think (have an opinion), imagine (guess, believe), plan (have a firm intent), hope, wish, believe, understand. NO -ing. But see exceptions below.

I think he is wrong about that.
I plan to travel to London next month.
Karen understands everything in this lesson.

Exceptions may occur when the verb takes on a slightly different meaning.
think (ponder), imagine (form a mental picture),
plan (participate actively in making plans) With or without -ing.

Without -ing. Habitual.
I often think about the meaning of life.
Children often imagine that they can fly.
Larry plans a trip to China every year, but never goes.

With -ing. Action in progress.
I'm thinking about what she meant by her remarks.
I'm imagining myself as a rich man.
Charles is planning a trip to Australia.

And some of these verbs (wish, hope) connote something more temporary when used with -ing.
Laura is wishing for a new coat this Christmas.
I'm hoping for good weather tomorrow.

Verbs of stance: stand, lie, live. With -ing. Temporary. / Without -ing. Permanent.

George is standing over there, in the corner.
That statue stands in the main hall of the hotel.
Mary is lying on the couch just now.
The valley lies between Mount Snowy and Mount Grace.
We're living in Detroit for now. We may move soon.
We live in Kansas, and we always have.

Stative verbs in general. NO -ing.
contain, belong, matter, deserve, consist, please, depend, own, possess, have, ... [There are many.]

Exception: When the verb takes a non-stative meaning, it may have -ing.
I have two sisters and a brother. NO -ing. Stative meaning.
I'm having a party this Saturday night. -ing. Non-stative meaning.

Exception: When there is a progressive change of state, there may be an -ing.
This situation is pleasing me less and less.
The fact that he is ill is mattering more and more.

____________________

Now are you glad you asked? Or sorry? Emotion: smile

CJ
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AnonymousWish,want,love,hate,like,think,taste,seem and belong.
As for your specific examples, wish, love, hate, and like take on the idea of something temporary when used with -ing. This was mentioned specifically for the verb wish and for verbs of stance in my previous post. As with other statives, you can use the -ing form with 'more and more' or 'less and less', but these are less common patterns. You should be using these without -ing 98% of the time.

wanting is extremely rare. I recommend using only want in all cases. And my advice is the same for seem and belong. You would never say things like the following:

*I am wanting to see that.
*It is seeming to me that he is tired.
*The car is belonging to Fred.

think and taste were discussed in detail in my previous post, so I will not repeat that discussion here.

CJ
CalifJim
Anonymouscan Can you please explain when i I can add 'ing'?
The use and non-use of -ing with stative verbs is a very big topic. The following touches on a few points you may find useful.Verbs of sensation: Verbs of the production of sensation: smell, taste, feel, look, sound. NO -ing. The flower smells good. That noise sounds like a cricket. The stew tastes too salty. Verbs of passive reception: smell, taste, feel, see, hear. NO -ing. I smell something burning. Do you taste the nutmeg in this sauce? Paul heard the alarm bell. Verbs of active, attentive reception: smell, taste, feel, look at, listen to. Without -ing. Habitual. Jane often tastes the soup as she cooks it. We often look at those old photos. Richard never listens to classical music. With -ing. Action in progress. JoAnn is smelling the flower by inhaling deeply. Frank is feeling the carpet to decide if it will be thick enough. The children are listening to their favorite radio program. Special cases: Imaginary or hallucinatory sensations. -ing. see, hear. He is seeing things. He is hearing voices.Verbs of bodily sensations: itch, ache, feel (a physical sensation, not a tactile sensation as above). With or without -ing. Same meaning either way. My arm [itches / is itching]. Her head [aches / is aching]. I [don't feel / am not feeling] well this morning.Verbs of mental activity: think (have an opinion), imagine (guess, believe), plan (have a firm intent), hope, wish, believe, understand. NO -ing. But see exceptions below. I think he is wrong about that. I plan to travel to London next month. Karen understands everything in this lesson. Exceptions may occur when the verb takes on a slightly different meaning. think (ponder), imagine (form a mental picture), plan (participate actively in making plans) With or without -ing. Without -ing. Habitual. I often think about the meaning of life. Children often imagine that they can fly. Larry plans a trip to China every year, but never goes. With -ing. Action in progress. I'm thinking about what she meant by her remarks. I'm imagining myself as a rich man. Charles is planning a trip to Australia. And some of these verbs (wish, hope) connote something more temporary when used with -ing. Laura is wishing for a new coat this Christmas. I'm hoping for good weather tomorrow.Verbs of stance: stand, lie, live. With -ing. Temporary. / Without -ing. Permanent. George is standing over there, in the corner. That statue stands in the main hall of the hotel. Mary is lying on the couch just now. The valley lies between Mount Snowy and Mount Grace. We're living in Detroit for now. We may move soon. We live in Kansas, and we always have.Stative verbs in general. NO -ing. contain, belong, matter, deserve, consist, please, depend, own, possess, have, ... [There are many.] Exception: When the verb takes a non-stative meaning, it may have -ing. I have two sisters and a brother. NO -ing. Stative meaning. I'm having a party this Saturday night. -ing. Non-stative meaning. Exception: When there is a progressive change of state, there may be an -ing. This situation is pleasing me less and less. The fact that he is ill is mattering more and more.______________________Now are you glad you asked? Or sorry? CJ

What a great explaination CJ!