Hi,

I just botched a reply on the above subject, which led me to the following site:

http://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/support-files/stative-verbs-list.pdf

More than half of the "illegal" sentences quoted on the site strike me as quite natural with the right context.

These are the ones I find natural. Why are they illegal?

(I'm not asking for a point by point explanation - just a general comment.)

I am wishing I had studied more.

This cake is weighing 450g. (I'm looking at the scale.)

I’m not understanding this question.

I’m supposing John will be late.

Your idea is sounding great.

He wasn’t remembering my name.

I am promising to help you tomorrow.

I am owing you £20.

At three o’clock yesterday I was needing a taxi.

She isn’t minding the noise.

I am liking reading detective stories.

The job is involving a lot of travelling.

This cookbook is including a recipe for bread.

He was impressing me with his story.

Are you hearing music?

I am not feeling that this is a good idea.

I am disagreeing with you.

This is concerning you.

She wasn’t agreeing with us.

Many thanks! - A.
Not 'illegal' (if any grammar structure is), but highly unlikely unless within very specific circumstances. It is extremelyy difficult to construct a stand-alone sentence that others cannot complain is right or wrong under special circumstances that they can bring to their imagination. Among your list, I can find only three that bring no special redeeming circumstances to my mind:

This cake is weighing 450g.

I am owing you £20.

This cookbook is including a recipe for bread.
Well said. Thanks!

(I won't bore you with my "redeeming circumstances" for the lonely three.) Emotion: geeked

Best wishes, - A.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
More than half of the "illegal" sentences quoted on the site strike me as quite natural with the right context.

A common observation.

___________

This topic can be an enormous can of worms. The authors of such dos and don'ts usually mean that the continuous forms are not used "in the intended reading". And of course, the intended reading is the one in which the continuous is not used. It gets circular. These verbs are not used in the continuous when they are meant in the sense of the simple; they are not used in the continuous unless they are meant in the sense of the continuous, and they're not often meant in the continuous.

This kind of explanation is much easier than trying to figure out what the heck the conditions (specifically and in detail) are for the use of the continuous in the case of each of those verbs. Anyway, if you did have some such complex explanations, the learners would be catatonic with puzzlement before they got through the first page of them. Better to have them memorize a few rules that will stop them from driving us all nuts by saying "I am having" every single time they want to say "I have".

Clear? Emotion: smile

CJ

P.S. Curiously, my list is just about the same as Mr. M.'s. I have the same three plus:

At three o’clock yesterday I was needing a taxi.

I couldn't contextualize that one either.

CJ
It will come to you the next time you dream about New York or Paris - or maybe Beijing.

Many thanks. A practical approach!

- A.