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Did you stay up all night in preparation for your study?

How come in this sentence instead of stayed we use stay, the reason I ask is because the sentence begins with a past tense verb (did)? Is it because of the modal rule(do/did) so stay is in its base form?
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pleasehelpDid you stay up all night in preparation for your study?

How come in this sentence instead of stayed we use stay, the reason I ask is because the sentence begins with a past tense verb (did)? Is it because of the modal rule(do/did) so stay is in its base form?



I would like to know what the modal rule is if somebody would go into it.

Here I think it is the fact that you are asking a question. The verb is "did stay," as in "You did stay up all night." When you re-arrange things to ask a question, the verb tenses get left alone.
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jemaasjr is right about the question.
In US grammar school, we used to run through the tenses:
present tense - I stay, do stay, am staying.

We rarely use "I do stay" in this exact form, but it's absolutely essential for questions and negative statements.
Do you often stay up late?
Don't stay up too late!

past tense - I stayed, did stay, was staying

(The second one is defined as the past tense of "to do" plus the bare infinitive.)

Did you stay for the end of the game?
I didn't stay to see the fireworks.
pleasehelpIs it because of the modal rule(do/did) so stay is in its base form?
Yes, that's the general idea, although the verb do (do, does, did) is not considered a modal, but an auxiliary verb.

When a form of do co-occurs with another verb for which it is the auxiliary, the other verb is always in the base form. This typically happens in negations and questions.

CJ
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May I know the gist of "the modal rule (do/did)" ??

And when is it correct to use the term "bare infinitive," and when is it correct to use the term "base form" ?? Emotion: smile
AvangiMay I know the gist of "the modal rule (do/did)"
An infinitive without to goes after a modal verb: can do, would see, should know, may decide, ... Neither the modal nor the following verb is inflected. This rule does not include do, which is inflected.
AvangiAnd when is it correct to use the term "bare infinitive," and when is it correct to use the term "base form" ??
They are equivalent. But infinitive has more than four letters, so it's quicker to type base form! Emotion: smile

Seriously, I usually try to answer in terms of the question. If the questioner uses the term 'base form', I assume that's the term he or she is most familiar with from his or her classwork, so I answer using the same term. Besides, the 'complicated' word infinitive bothers some learners, especially beginners.

CJ
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