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If you want to stay the night here, this sofa can easily be turned into a bed.

If you want to stay overninght here, ...

If you want to stay over the night here, ...

Do all of the above sound as right and mean the same? Thanks.
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If you want to stay

the night here,
overnight here,
over the night here,
here overnight,
here for the night,

this sofa ...


The first two sound strange, but understandable.
The third is not correct at all.
The last two are more usual.
The very last is my favorite.

CJ
Comments  
Hi Angliholic,

All of the above are actually understandable. However, I most probably would say:

"This sofa can easily be turned into a bed, if you want to stay here overnight."

Notice that:

1) the English speakers hear 'music' if they put the adverb of time (in this case 'overnight') directly at the end of the sentence (in this case at the end of the 'if clause' (in bold letters above)

2) the English speakers also feel better if they put the adverb of place (in the example above 'here') directly after the verb ('want to stay').

Cheers,

Flexicap

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks, Flexicap and Jim.