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Hi.

Cook the candy mixture over heat, very low and steady.

Cook the candy mixture over heat, very low and steadily.

What's really the difference between steady and steadily? They are both used as adverbs in the above context. It's so puzzling to me. Would you please explain its grammar to me?
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English words can be used as different parts of speech.

Steady can be an adjective, adverb, or verb.
Informally, it is used in place of the formal adverb form with the suffix -ly. (steadily)

An example is the nautical phrase: Slow and steady as she goes.

See entry #17.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/steadily
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So, both of the given sentences mean the same with the exception that one is more formal, right?
In my previous post, I did not consider the sentences, only the single word "steady" versus "steadily."
Neither sentence is good.

1. Cook the candy mixture over heat, very low and steady.
"Low and steady" is an adjective phrase. It must be placed before the noun.
The correct version is: Cook the candy mixture over very low, steady heat.

2. Cook the candy mixture over heat, very low and steadily.
This is ungrammatical. It has a coordinating conjunction between an adjective and adverb, which does not work.
The correct version is: Cook the candy mixture steadily over low heat.
1. Cook the candy mixture over heat, very low and steady.

This version is in my textbook (Let's Write English, by George E. Wishon)

Our teacher said low and steady in the given sentence are adverbs!
AlpheccaStars"Low and steady" is an adjective phrase.
Why can't it be an adverb phrase? Both low and steady can be used as adverbs.
AlpheccaStarsIt must be placed before the noun.
You are right, but I think the comma after heat allows the the adjective phrase follow the noun; am I right?

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Persian LearnerOur teacher said low and steady in the given sentence are adverbs!
While it's true that both can be adverbs, it does not fit the context.

Since adverbs can be moved, let's examine simplified versions of the sentence.

1. Cook the candy low over heat. (low is very unnatural as an adverb with the verb cook.)
2. Cook the candy steady over heat. (steady is unnatural as an adverb with the verb cook. Native speakers use "steadily" in this sentence. "Steady" as an adverb has different usage. e.g. Hold the ladder steady while I climb it.)
3. Cook the candy over low heat. (Low is completely natural as an adjective, modifying "heat.")
4. Cook the candy over steady heat. (Steady is natural as an adjective, modifying "heat." It means that the heat does not vary. )

While the sentence is understandable, it is a very poor example of native English.
Does not help with the original question, the difference between steady and steadily? Please clarify?

'Steady' is an adjective, and 'steadily' is an adverb.

'Steady' describes a noun, and 'steadily' describes a verb or adjective.

'Cook the mixture over heat, very low and steady' = a bit of a strange sentence, but 'low and steady' is describing what the heat should be ('heat' is a noun in this sentence).

Compare with 'Stir the mixture slowly' = 'slowly' is an adverb describing how you should 'stir' the mixture (stir + slowly = verb + adverb)

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