I am to write about stereotypes in British English and Scottish English and have made this thesis, but I am not satisfied with it. It must be possible to say the same thing clearer than this below. Do you have any suggestions, please? (of course, in correct British English).
Sociolinguistics, Scottish and British English must be in the sentence, but not so clumsy as below, please.
It is necessary that it is clear that there is a difference between British English and Scottish English, but any synonyms are welcome (not slang,please)
"What language stereotypes do the native British English Speakers use about the native Scottish English Speakers and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"
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I am to write about stereotypes in British English and Scottish English and have made this thesis, but I am ... British English Speakers use about the native Scottish English Speakers and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"

Unless there are clubs of those names, I wouldn't capitalize "speakers". This isn't German, after all.
I would make the part from "observed" on into a second sentence. I would think almost any answer would be "socio" or linguistic or both, and I don't fault you for specifing what you want, but it makes the sentence you have too long and tedious.
I don't see the need for "the" before "native", but maybe in Britain people talk that way.
Are there really stererotypes about native Scottish-English speakers, or are they just about the Scots? And vice versa.

When used as adjectives S-English and B-English require hyphens to make the two words into one, so to speak.

Posters should say where they live, and for which
area they are asking questions. I have lived in
Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 10 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
I am to write about stereotypes in British English and Scottish English and have made this thesis, but I am ... British English Speakers use about the native Scottish English Speakers and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"

From a sociolinguistic point of view, what language stereotypes do native British English speakers and native Scottish English speakers apply to each other.
(I dislike "vice versa." Seems lazy. And setting the point of view up front orients the reader to the broad topic.)
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"What language stereotypes do the native British English Speakers use about the native Scottish English Speakers and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"

How about: "What language stereotypes do native British English and Scottish English speakers have about each other, as observed from a sociolinguistic point of view? "
"Gerald Clough" (Email Removed) skrev i meddelelsen
I am to write about stereotypes in British English and ... and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"

From a sociolinguistic point of view, what language stereotypes do native British English speakers and native Scottish English speakers apply to each other. (I dislike "vice versa." Seems lazy. And setting the point of view up front orients the reader to the broad topic.)

I agree and thank you all for your inputs.
"What language stereotypes do the native British English Speakers use about the native Scottish English Speakers and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"

How about: "What language stereotypes do native British English and Scottish English speakers have about each other, as observed from a sociolinguistic point of view? "
- er ... native British English and Scottish English speakers... do this "native" goes for both BrE and Scottish English speakers?

But thank you very much for your input.
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"What language stereotypes do the native British English Speakers use ... and vice versa observed from a sociolinguistic point of view?"

How about: "What language stereotypes do native British English and Scottish English speakers have about each other, as observed from ... er ... native British English and Scottish English speakers... do this "native" goes for both BrE and Scottish English speakers?

I think that would be the default assumption for most readers. To remove the potential for ambiguity, though, you could write "... native speakers of BrE & ScE ...".

Odysseus
How about: "What language stereotypes do native British English and ... this "native" goes for both BrE and Scottish English speakers?

I think that would be the default assumption for most readers. To remove the potential for ambiguity, though, you could write "... native speakers of BrE & ScE ...".

I don't care for the implied contrast: speakers of Scottish English (in its several versions) are British.. One could say "Standard British English", perhaps, though some features of Scottish speech are imitated as stereotypical by speakers of other non-standard British dialects.

Alan Jones
I don't care for the implied contrast: speakers of Scottish English (in its several versions) are British.. One could say "Standard British English", perhaps, though some features of Scottish speech are imitated as stereotypical by speakers of other non-standard British dialects.

Yes, that made me uncomfortable too.

Odysseus
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