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Charlotte walked past the neighbor's house, looking at the overgrown front yard lawn.

A month later.

Charlotte walked past the neighbor's house, bemoaning the still growing front yard lawn.


Is writing "the still growing front yard lawn" OK to mean that the grass is very tall and has been for a long time? Also, should "still growing" be hyphenated?

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Is writing "the still growing front yard lawn" OK to mean that the grass is very tall and has been for a long time? No. The word 'overgrown' is much better here.

Also, should "still growing" be hyphenated? Yes

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CliveIs writing "the still growing front yard lawn" OK to mean that the grass is very tall and has been for a long time? No. The word 'overgrown' is much better here.

But if I have used "overgrown" earlier in my story so the reader is already aware that the neighbor's front yard lawn is overgrown, can't I use "the still-growing front yard lawn" the second time I mention it which is a month later in the story? And would it tell that the lawn hasn't been mowed since then?

Yes.

Now you're telling me more about the context than you did originally.

Here in deepest suburbia, USA, "front yard lawn" is unidiomatic. We call it the front lawn, and if we aren't experts on this, I don't know who is. You could also say "the overgrown front yard", which takes in all the property in front, not just what would be lawn if it was tended.

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