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Hello,

1., I had believed that in the case of question or negation "still" became "yet", then I came across the following sentence: "Langdom still had not got used to these moments of unexpected celebrity." (The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown) Is it correct? I mean, it is obviously correct, but if this kind of usage of "still" is proper what the rule is?

2., My second question referred to "meet". Despite grammar books, I have seen so far, say that "meet" doesn’t have preposition, I’ve come across kinds of sentences where "meet" had "with" prepostition. Actually, is it correct to say e.g. I met with Tom yesterday?

Thank you
Comments  
Yes, both examples are in common use in UK English.

"To meet with (somebody)" is OK, although "to meet (somebody)" is more common. You will also hear "to meet up with (somebody)". A lot of phrases such as this tend to vary according to dialect and district.

Note, however, that Americans use the phrase "to visit with (somebody)" whereas this is never used in British English where only "to visit (somebody)" is used.
Eimai_AnglosYes, both examples are in common use in UK English.

"To meet with (somebody)" is OK, although "to meet (somebody)" is more common. You will also hear "to meet up with (somebody)". A lot of phrases such as this tend to vary according to dialect and district.

Note, however, that Americans use the phrase "to visit with (somebody)" whereas this is never used in British English where only "to visit (somebody)" is used. Yes, we usually visit "with" someone to indicate that we had a conversation, usually in person and quite and meeting quite coincidentally, but possibly by phone as well. To "visit" here is to 'go to visit' or to 'pay a visit (to)'.
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Hello there,
【quote ⊂ jupath】
I had believed that in the case of question or negation "still" became "yet."
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My dictionary says so, too, but I have a vague feeling that [still not ~ ] and [not yet] could be used synonymously, and negation of 'still' is [not anymore].  ...no?
JupathHello,

1., I had believed that in the case of question or negation "still" became "yet", then I came across the following sentence: "Langdom still had not got used to these moments of unexpected celebrity." (The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown) Is it correct? I mean, it is obviously correct, but if this kind of usage of "still" is proper what the rule is?

2., My second question referred to "meet". Despite grammar books, I have seen so far, say that "meet" doesn’t have preposition, I’ve come across kinds of sentences where "meet" had "with" prepostition. Actually, is it correct to say e.g. I met with Tom yesterday?

Thank you

According to my dictionary, meet with means having a meeting with someone.
Thanks for your replies. If I say "meet with", does it also have a kind of feeling like "visit with". I mean, it indicates as well that we had a conversation? or it doesn’t have such meaning?
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You use "still" before the negation, and "yet" after it. "he still hasn't understood" / "he doesn't understand yet".