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Hi teachers,

Can I use the word "Still" at the end of the sentence? Is it grammatically correct?

Examples:

I didn't go still.

I didn't find other ways to solve the problem still.


Thank you

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anonymousCan I use the word "Still" at the end of the sentence?

Yes, but not in the meaning you intend to. Still has many meanings: Still, he is still standing still.

CB

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Comments  

"Still" can have two meanings in such sentences:

1 - until now

2 - despite some situation

Which one do you mean?

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anonymousCan I use the word "Still" at the end of the sentence?

Yes, but not as you have done here. "He got a dog, but he was lonely still." It is quite literary, even poetical, but it can be done. But in reality everybody would say that "He got a dog, but he was still lonely."

I mean the first one.


Thanks

anonymousI mean the first one. Thanks

In that case, those sentences should use the present perfect tense.

anonymous

I didn't still haven't go gone/been. still.

Do you know the difference between "gone" and "been"?

anonymous

I didn't find still haven't found other ways to solve the problem. still.

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anonymous
anonymousCan I use the word "Still" at the end of the sentence?

Yes, but not as you have done here. "He got a dog, but he was lonely still." It is quite literary, even poetical, but it can be done. But in reality everybody would say that "He got a dog, but he was still lonely."

Thank you for your clarification.

teechr
anonymousI mean the first one. Thanks

In that case, those sentences should use the present perfect tense.

anonymous

I didn't still haven't go gone/been. still.

Do you know the difference between "gone" and "been"?

anonymous

I didn't find still haven't found other ways to solve the problem. still.


"I still haven't gone." is clear.

"I still haven't been." such structure honestly wouldn't be that clear to me. I mean I feel I want to complete it to be "I still haven't been there."

I usually use "been" like the following examples:

- I've been to that library before.

- I've never been to the park before.

- I've been here for 2 hours.

- I've been there.

When I use such structures, I find the use of "been" is clearer as "existence"; it was coming from "to be". And logically if there were " existence", it means I went there. So someone might use them interchangeably.

Am I right?


One more thing, please. You stated that "still" can have 2 meanings when it comes at the end of the sentence. How could I determine which meaning was the speaker meant?

If I use "still" at the end of the sentence with the same examples you have corrected.

- I haven't gone still.

- I haven't found other ways to solve the problem still.

When I read them, I find that both of them fit to have the tow meanings although I want to mean just one meaning.


Thanks a lot.

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Cool Breeze
anonymousCan I use the word "Still" at the end of the sentence?

Yes, but not in the meaning you intend to. Still has many meanings: Still, he is still standing still.

CB

So, if I mean "until now", I can't use "still" at the end of the sentence? right?


Regarding your example : "Still, he is still standing still."

I would guess the meaning of "still" based on the context and what I understood of your reply.

The green still means "until now".

The blue still means " Despite of".

The red still, I'm not sure, but it could have the same meaning as the green one although it may consider redundant. But in speaking it's very acceptable any way.

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