In our laboratory we usually refer to "stool" while outside the laboratory people generally speak of faeces.
I've never understood the difference except when as a young medical student one professor used to talk about straining to stool. I prefer having a "stool manual" as opposed to a "faeces manual" I'd appreciate your thoughts.
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In our laboratory we usually refer to "stool" while outside the laboratory people generally speak of faeces. I've never understood ... about straining to stool. I prefer having a "stool manual" as opposed to a "faeces manual" I'd appreciate your thoughts.

The person here who wrote about breast feeding quite recently, another topic civilized people don't discuss at the dinner table, may be happy to exchange views with you on the topic of faeces. I doubt you'll find many other takers.

Charles Riggs
Actually, there isn't an accented
letter in my email address
I'd appreciate your thoughts.

"poppycock" comes from the Dutch for soft crap. They probably have a word for hard crap, but I don't know it is.
http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-pop1.htm
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Zephir Woodwood hayshed:
In our laboratory we usually refer to "stool" while outside the laboratory people generally speak of faeces. I've never understood ... about straining to stool. I prefer having a "stool manual" as opposed to a "faeces manual" I'd appreciate your thoughts.

"Stool" is technically a euphemism, and I'd oppose it on those grounds. Medical euphemisms only serve to confuse the patients.

("Have you passed any flatus today?" "No, doc, but I've sure been farting a lot." Others might well prefer to answer "no" rather than admit they didn't understand the question.)
Originally the "stool" was the place where you sat while crapping, hence the "straining at stool" reference. (NB: not "straining to stool".) Eventually some not-so-bright sparks must have started using the word to refer to the product of sitting on the stool.

Even if you accept the euphemism, the two words don't quite mean the same. "Faeces" is a collective term, while a "stool" is a single turd, invariably in solid form. If you have diarrhoea you produce faeces but not stools.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
In our laboratory we usually refer to "stool" while outside ... as opposed to a "faeces manual" I'd appreciate your thoughts.

The person here who wrote about breast feeding quite recently, another topic civilized people don't discuss at the dinner table, may be happy to exchange views with you on the topic of faeces. I doubt you'll find many other takers.

Bush II may talk about it with him. He used the word several=20 times in a recent speech about abortion, instead of the more=20 usual term, fetus. We know he's an idiot, but he's our idiot.
dg (domain=3Dccwebster)
I prefer having a "stool manual" as opposed to a "faeces manual"

Place the manual in the lab and tell everyone what it's for. Not what it is*, but what it is *for. Do not write anything on it.

After six weeks, find out what everyone is calling it. Write that on the cover and spine.

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
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Zephir Woodwood hayshed:

In our laboratory we usually refer to "stool" while outside ... as opposed to a "faeces manual" I'd appreciate your thoughts.

"Stool" is technically a euphemism, and I'd oppose it on those grounds. Medical euphemisms only serve to confuse the patients.

There was a monarch in Ghana who, according to British anthropologists, was not enthroned, but enstooled.
Was that a euphemism or a dysphemism?
And then I have heard the loo referred to as the throne room.

And a friend of mine, who was a car fan, on looking inside a Ferrari remarked "That's my dicing throne."

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
I prefer having a "stool manual" as opposed to a "faeces manual"

Place the manual in the lab and tell everyone what it's for. Not what it is*, but what it is *for. Do not write anything on it. After six weeks, find out what everyone is calling it. Write that on the cover and spine.

What if they're calling it "toilet paper"?

Regards,
Mark Barratt
I'd appreciate your thoughts.

"poppycock" comes from the Dutch for soft crap. They probably have a word for hard crap, but I don't know it is. http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-pop1.htm

Dear Mr Quinion is mistaken is this. 'Poppycock' does indeed comes from Dutch 'poep' ='crap' soft or not, it's just the universal colloquial word for 'faeces'. There's a word in Dutch for the soft variety, but as there are people in this ng who are of the opinion that something so natural as "breastfeeding" 'civilized people don't discuss at the dinner table', I think they will be mightily offended by my giving the translation in English for this here.
BTW we must be a very uncivilized people as we have no compunction in talking about breastfeeding at the dinner table.
Cheers
Only after the last tree has been cut down,
Only after the last river has been poisoned,
Only after the last fish has been caught,
Only then will you find out that money cannot be eaten.

Cree Indian prophecy.
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