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We know we can say "a three-legged table", "a ten-year old boy". "three-legged "shows state while "ten-year" number. But what about "a ten-storeyed building" and "a ten-storey building"? Which is right? Perhaps both are right. Right?
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AmE is ten-story building. I'm not confident about BrE usage.
I think both "a ten-storeyed building" and "a ten-storey building" are valid.

"ten-storeyed building" refers to, uh, "quality" meaning "a building that has 10 stories" in the same way that "three-legged stool" means "a stool that has three legs"

"ten-storey building" refers to "number" wherein the number of storeys is indicated. similar examples would be "8-year old boy" (showing number of years) and "21-gun salute" (showing how many guns were used).

by the way, i find the differences between American English and British English in spelling the word "storey" rather interesting

isn't it that "storey" is more British and "story" is more American?

I mean, why do Americans drop the "e"?

They even spell the plural forms differently. Brit English spells it "storeys" while Americans spell it "stories."

The American spellings of both singular and plural forms are a source of confusion for a number of Filipinos, who are non-native English speakers (or writers, readers).

The American spelling "story" (plural form "stories) is exactly the same whether one refers to a) a room-filled structural unit that's part of a building and b) a "story" (or "stories") referring to a tale, or narrative with plot, characters, etc.

In the Philippines, editors have told me to use the American spelling since there's this unofficial rule that we're supposed to use American English, having been an American colony during the last century.

However, sometimes I get stubborn enough to use the British spelling "storey" or "storeys" simply to avoid the confusion I mentioned earlier. Some editors of course, change the spelling back to the American one.

I've learned to avoid lengthy arguments with editors by using the word "floor" or "floors" instead, heheEmotion: wink
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I think both are correct but depend on context... the "ten-storey" building is used as a noun (The ten-story building blocked my view) that works best. If "10-storeyed" is used as a verb participal I think the -ed (a verb suffix) should be used: (Their structure was streamlined and multi-high storeyed.)

sigh I taught grammar the way I had been taught. I sure hope you know the difference between a noun and a verb... I think some teachers think it is antique.
Grammar GeekAmE is ten-story building. I'm not confident about BrE usage.

We would say a ten-storey building. I wouldn't say a ten storeyed building.

Quigquigg; keep the spellings that you usually use and keep the continuity throughout AmE or BrE if you use just one type of spelling even if it AmE to a British person, they will understand and if all the spellings are AmE then it won't matter. For most exams they would expect continuity rather than knowing all the differences.
Correct me if I am worng. This type of compound adjective is made up of an adjective and a noun which sometimes may not be hyphenated, depending on the person. But to me, it would seem peculiar to me to end it "ed":

Ten-storyed building
Fifteen-minuted walk
Seven-dayed cruise
Five- coursed dinner

Just a thought...
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Hi,

You'll sometimes see eg a ten-storied building.

All your other examples are compltely unidiomatic, and just wrong.

Clive
Anonymous(Their structure was streamlined and multi-high storeyed.)
sigh I taught grammar the way I had been taught. I sure hope you know the difference between a noun and a verb... I think some teachers think it is antique.
Hi Anon,
I speak and write American English. I find your comment quite intriguqing. Since you teach English, I would like for you to enlightned me on how by adding "ed" to a compound adjective would make it a participle? Isn't it true that a participle is a 'perfect' (or passive) form of a verb? How can "multi-high storyed" be a partciple, being that "story" is not a verb? That being said, I agree with you on "streamlined" though.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/streamlined?show=0&t=1282941251

  1. streamlined (adjective)
  2. streamline (transitive verb)
dimsumexpressCorrect me if I am worng. This type of compound adjective is made up of an adjective and a noun which sometimes may not be hyphenated, depending on the person. But to me, it would seem peculiar to me to end it "ed":Ten-storyed buildingFifteen-minuted walkSeven-dayed cruiseFive- coursed dinnerJust a thought...

No it's a:

Fifteen minute walk

Seven day cruise.

Five course dinner.
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