Hello.
Which are the differences for words "strange" and "weird"? It seems to have the same significance but in spoken language (american) the second is more used than the first.
Thank you for any explanation,
Nicola
Hello. Which are the differences for words "strange" and "weird"? It seems to have the same significance but in spoken language (american) the second is more used than the first.

Strange = unusual or unexpected.
Weird = not understandable, or deviant.
Selling peanut butter and jam sandwiches in Britain would be strange.

Liking peanut butter and jam sandwiches in Britain would be weird.

Owain
They do have very similar usage in spoken English in this area (dialect) of the United States. However, "weird" would be considered more familiar and less formal in my opinion. Further, they both tend to have a certain degree of negativity associated with them. If you want lessen the degree of negativity, you would probably use "different" in this dialect. "Odd," a synonym, can be negative or less so depending on the intonation.

All of this is my opinion. More formally, I'm sure the dictionary could offer more insight.
Dan
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Owain schrieb:
Hello. Which are the differences for words "strange" and "weird"? ... language (american) the second is more used than the first.

Strange = unusual or unexpected. Weird = not understandable, or deviant. Selling peanut butter and jam sandwiches in Britain would be strange. Liking peanut butter and jam sandwiches in Britain would be weird.

I've always had a weakness for them myself - ever since I was introduced to them at boarding school (an American fellow pupil) - long before it was possible to buy peanut butter on this side of the water.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Basically they are the same but weird is a
slightly more intense term, just as unusual
or different would be less intense while bizarre
or lunatic would be more intense.
Consider the different ways of saying
someone is overweight. Terms can vary
from chubby, plump, rotund to obese,
blimpish, gargantuan, elephantine ...
Thank you very much to all of you!
Now it's clear, very clear. It's quite as I was thinking.

Also thank you,
Nicola
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