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I don't know why the following can be grammatically correct. I would like to know what kinds of grammar to support this usage. I ould like to learn how to use.
(*** denotes my supposed problematic areas)
- *** wind cool, while sweet-scented osmanthus fragrant, China is flooded with moon cakes.*** Awakening! Autumn Festival is forthcoming once again!
- *** be the ***, but I thought you had had enough of the weird jokes *** to put this one past *** (NB: I suspect this statement is really wrong!)

Thanks a lot.
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This is a matter of poetic license. It may also be translation problems. These have the flavor of Japanese poetry.

The second example is perfectly correct grammatically, however.

"You be the judge" is an idiomatic expression for "Be the judge" (a simple imperative) or, more simply, "Judge", or "Judge for yourself", "Make your own judgment". (all simple imperatives).

So this is saying "You can make your own judgment, but this is mine: I thought (that) you ..."

Another idiom occurs at the end: "to put something past someone" means to deceive someone, to trick someone.

The structure in the middle could also be a stumbling block: "to ... enough ... (not) to ..."

"You know enough not to trust Jerry."
"Jerry has learned enough to succeed in the writing assignment."
"The child is smart enough not to put his hand in the fire."

Likewise, "You had enough of the weird jokes not to trick me with this joke."
As a reported thought: "I thought you had had enough of the weird jokes not to put this one (joke) past me."

All together,
"You be the judge, but I thought you had had enough of the weird jokes not to put this one past me."


This is a matter of poetic license. It may also be translation problems. These have the flavor of Japanese poetry.


It appears to mean its structure is:
Instead of:
Subject + verb + object/adj/adv. Subject + verb + object/adj/adv. Subject + verb + object/adj/adv
It uses:
Subject + object/adj/adv, Subject + object/adj/adv, Subject + verb + object/adj/adv

So can I say something like:
I a boy, while you a girl, we can develop our relationship further?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
For the secnd one, It seems the statement is a bt clumsy.

You be the judge

I wonder if it forms as a complete sentence alone (if so, is "be" the verb)
Can I apply it to other cases too (ie using its structure to form other sentences)?
eg:
- You be a gentleman. You have to be as politeas possible.
- Students be smart, ok?
This is a very restricted idiom. It is "You be the judge" and only "You be the judge" in its strictest form, meaning "Make your own judgment.".

Even if the restrictions are loosened, the first three words must remain the same: "You be the X".
In this case the expression can be used to assign roles, whether for a play or for a project that several people will carry out.

Pointing to one person after another, assigning roles in a play:

"You be the mother; you be the father; you be the boss; you be the firefighter; you be the saint; ..."

Pointing to one person after another, assigning roles in a project:

"You be the project leader; you be the facilitator; you be the officer of the budget; you be the software designer; you be the manager of testing; ..."

Remember the implied subject of an imperative is always "you", so "you" is the only word that can be the subject of the imperative "be".
Thanks a lot.
How about my questions about the poetic licence issue?
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From "You be the judge", it indeed tells you to make your own judgment.
So if I say "you be the moher", I might indeed wish to say something like "you should act like a typical mother to take care and loveyour children.

That means it is not taken literally. It doesn't just tell you to be a mother; be a judge; be a fireman etc. It is to tell you to act like the typical characteristics of a mother/judge/fireman etc.

Confirm my ideas (if possibe). Thanks!
Can I say something like:
I a boy, while you a girl, we can develop our relationship further?

______

Yes, in poetry, but not in ordinary conversation or writing.
Outside of the context of poetry a statement like that will elicit strange looks!

Emotion: smile


From "You be the judge", it indeed tells you to make your own judgment.
So if I say "you be the moher", I might indeed wish to say something like "you should act like a typical mother to take care and loveyour children.

That means it is not taken literally. It doesn't just tell you to be a mother; be a judge; be a fireman etc. It is to tell you to act like the typical characteristics of a mother/judge/fireman etc.

Confirm my ideas (if possibe). Thanks!


How about the above?
Any idea?
Am I right?
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