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You will need a few basic tools. If you are just replacing a damaged plug you will probably only need a screwdriver. If you need to strip back the insulation and trim the wires you will also need a sharp knife and side cutters, or a wire stripping tool.
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What is the grammatical form and function of "back" in "strip back"?
How do we confirm that whether "strip back" is a phrasal verb or not?
What does is it mean in the context?

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JigneshbharatiWhat is the grammatical form and function of "back" in "strip back"?

It's variously called a preposition, an adverb, and a particle.

JigneshbharatiHow do we confirm that whether "strip back" is a phrasal verb or not?

There are a variety of tests.

If you can use the PP as a fragment in the answer to a question, it's a prepositional verb; else, it's a phrasal verb.

— Did they strip back the insulation?
— *No, back the wires.

This test results in a determination that 'strip back' is a phrasal verb.


If you can move the whole structure that looks like a PP to another part of the sentence, it's a prepositional verb. If you can't move the PP, then it's not really a PP, and you have a phrasal verb.

*Back the insulation you need to strip.

This test results in a determination that 'strip back' is a phrasal verb.


For more on this topic, see Differ between a preposition and an adverb in a phrasal verb.

CJ

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"back" is an adverb that modifies "strip". It indicates that the stripping is done in such a way that the insulation is drawn back from (away from) some point of reference, such as the end of the wire.

Idiomatic verb-adverb combinations with "small" adverbs may be classed as so-called "phrasal verbs". Also, "verb-adverb-object" word order (in this case "strip back the insulation") often indicates a phrasal verb. However, there is no exact test that can be applied such that everyone will always agree on what does and what does not qualify as a phrasal verb. I would personally say that "strip back" is a debatable case.

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In the light of CJ's reply, I should clarify that when I said "there is no exact test", I did not mean that there was no test to distinguish a phrasal verb from a prepositional verb (though just to add to the confusion, I believe that some people also include prepositional verbs as "phrasal verbs"). I meant that around the margins there was no exact test to always distinguish a "phrasal verb", which I believe many people consider must have sufficient idiomaticity (i.e. meaning not obvious from its parts), from a straightforward verb+adverb combination.

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CalifJimIt's variously called a preposition, an adverb, and a particle.

This issue has come up before, I think, but I cannot personally see any possible way that it can be called a preposition. Sometimes with words that can also be prepositions, such as "up", "down", etc., I think sometimes people don't distinguish properly between adverbial use (e.g. "pull up one's socks") and prepositional use (e.g. "look up the chimney"), but "back" can't ever be a preposition, as far as I am aware, so not even that explanation is available.

GPYThis issue has come up before, I think, but I cannot personally see any possible way that it can be called a preposition.

Emotion: yes

But for the sake of completeness, we have to recognize the latest trend to call many words prepositions which were classified differently before April, 2001.

You may want to take a look at the blog below, wherein are mentioned, among others, the prepositions after, before, since, till, until, although, because, lest, provided, though, unless, ashore, downstairs, home, and indoors.

http://prepositionphrases.blogspot.com/2014/07/from-cambridge-grammar-of-english.html

CJ

CalifJimBut for the sake of completeness, we have to recognize the latest trend to call many words prepositions which were classified differently before April, 2001. You may want to take a look at the blog below, wherein are mentioned, among others, the prepositions after, before, since, till, until, although, because, lest, provided, though, unless, ashore, downstairs, home, and indoors.http://prepositionphrases.blogspot.com/2014/07/from-cambridge-grammar-of-english.html

OK, thanks for the link. I do agree that it is debatable how far certain words traditionally classified as adverbs truly do "modify a verb, an adjective or another adverb" (though it is not so obvious to me why one would want to lump these together with prepositions). In this example, though, I would argue that "back" describes the way in which the wire is stripped, so would qualify as an adverb even under a strict interpretation of the traditional definition.

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 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.

It seems to me that the verb phrase "to strip back the insulation" cannot only be analysed strictly in a syntactic way. In my opinion, it should be also analysed semantically. I don't see "back the insulation" as a complement of the head of the VP, i.e., "to strip"; I see "back" as a modifier of the verb "to strip" and "the insulation" as a complement of the verb "to strip back".

tkacka15I don't see "back the insulation" as a complement of the head of the VP, i.e., "to strip";

I agree: it cannot possibly be interpreted this way.

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