I was listening to an interview with Jimmy Webb on the radio today. One of the things he was discussing was Richard Harris's rendition of Webb's song "MacArthur Park". He mentioned that Harris kept referring to it as "MacArthur's Park" and that Harris sang (sic) the verse

Spring was never waiting for us, girl
It ran one step ahead
As we followed in the dance
Between the parted pages and were pressed
In love's hot, fevered iron
Like a striped pair of pants
and pronounced "striped" as "stripe-ped". I would say "striped" without the double "p" sound. I hadn't thought about it, but I've heard "stripe-ped" before. Pondial?
Webb - who wrote Wichita Lineman, By the Time I Get to Phoenix, Galveston, and MacAurthur Park - made Number 1 on the charts only once: when Donna Summer covered MacAurthur Park with a disco beat. He said that every other song, no matter who covered it, placed behind some Beatles song.
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} I was listening to an interview with Jimmy Webb on the radio today. } One of the things he was discussing was Richard Harris's rendition of } Webb's song "MacArthur Park". He mentioned that Harris kept referring } to it as "MacArthur's Park" and that Harris sang (sic) the verse }
} Spring was never waiting for us, girl
} It ran one step ahead
} As we followed in the dance
} Between the parted pages and were pressed
} In love's hot, fevered iron
} Like a striped pair of pants
}
} and pronounced "striped" as "stripe-ped". I would say "striped" } without the double "p" sound. I hadn't thought about it, but I've } heard "stripe-ped" before. Pondial?
...
I went through this twice, and I'm still not sure of a couple of points. Are you talking about a two-syllable "striped" compared with a one-syllable "striped"? Or are you talking about an aspirated "p" of the sort that Britons, actors, and teachers of English are famous for, where Mainland English distinguishes between a stop and a plosive?

Let me give you a for instance. Back in the late fifties or early sixties, the McAns an apparently elderly couple with a talk show on WOR
710 AM 1440 Broadway used to mention from time to time "baked stuffedstriped bass" (pronounced ('[email protected]'[email protected]'straIped'b&s)) (MdE: "rockfish"). But I never really noticed either a double "p" sound or an inordinately aspirated "p".
ObAreff: The two-syllable "striped" is of course mandatory in Miste(r)Rogers's "Daniel Striped Tiger".

R. J. Valentine
Wh^W
I was listening to an interview with Jimmy Webb on the radio today. Webb - who wrote Wichita Lineman, By the Time I Get to Phoenix, Galveston, and MacAurthur Park -

Did he get a lifetime achievement award from Rand McNally?

Ross Howard
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} I was listening to an interview with Jimmy Webb on the radio today. } One of the things he ... that Britons, actors, and teachers of English are famous for, where Mainland English distinguishes between a stop and a plosive?

The two-syllable pronunciation. The Harris pronunciation is almost like two words.
Let me give you a for instance. Back in the late fifties or early sixties, the McAns an apparently ... bass" (pronounced ('[email protected]'[email protected]'straIped'b&s)) (MdE: "rockfish"). But I never really noticed either a double "p" sound or an inordinately aspirated "p".

I don't do the spelling out of sounds.
ObAreff: The two-syllable "striped" is of course mandatory in Miste(r)Rogers's "Daniel Striped Tiger".

I never watched the Mr Rogers show.
Spring was never waiting for us, girl It ran one step ahead As we followed in the dance Between the ... I would say "striped" without the double "p" sound. I hadn't thought about it, but I've heard "stripe-ped" before. Pondial?

I think it's more poetic than pondial. And the line does need an extra syllable.

Dena Jo
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On 11 Feb 2004 15:05:02 GMT, Dena Jo
Spring was never waiting for us, girl It ran one ... hadn't thought about it, but I've heard "stripe-ped" before. Pondial?

I think it's more poetic than pondial. And the line does need an extra syllable.

Webb wrote the line, and Webb was semi-seriously complaining about Harris's addition of the second syllable. Semi-seriously in that he seems to have too much respect for Harris to really complain.
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Webb wrote the line, and Webb was semi-seriously complaining about Harris's addition of the second syllable. Semi-seriously in that he seems to have too much respect for Harris to really complain.

I think Harris has the better ear.

Dena Jo
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On 11 Feb 2004 16:42:23 GMT, Dena Jo
Webb wrote the line, and Webb was semi-seriously complaining about ... to have too much respect for Harris to really complain.

I think Harris has the better ear.

Could be. The song was covered by several artists. I would think that each would adapt the phrasing slightly to accommodate the individual style of the singer. I wonder if others opted for the two-syllable version.
Of more interest to me, is the general pronunciation of "striped" when it doesn't have to fit with other things said or sung. If you said "The groom wore striped trousers", would you say it with one or two syllables? One for me. I have a hunch Harris would have used two even in this case.
Could be. The song was covered by several artists. I would think that each would adapt the phrasing slightly to accommodate the individual style of the singer. I wonder if others opted for the two-syllable version.

I would search Kazaa for other versions, but a record company might sue me.

Dena Jo
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