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Hi,

1) “I think that I’ve had my stroke of bad luck for today.” (Nothing else can go wrong.)

Could ‘stroke of bad luck’ be used in this example? Perhaps I’m confusing it with a different phrase.

2)"I am a huge animal lover and as such I would like to start a charity for dogs."

Is 'as such' correct in the sentence above?

I’ve already posted this question, but I didn’t get a clear answer. One person told me that it was correct while an anonymous said that it couldn’t be used that way.

Thank you so much! Emotion: smile

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"stroke of luck" refers to good luck. People do sometimes say "stroke of bad lack", e.g. "What a stroke of bad luck!", but its use in (1) does not feel tremendously natural to me, though I would not say it is definitely wrong.

"as such" is correctly used. Perhaps some people might think it a bit jargony or possibly superfluous in this context. Probably I would put commas around it too.

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Thank you so much!

What would you use instead of ‘bad stroke of luck’ in my first example?

Ann225What would you use instead of ‘bad stroke of luck’ in my first example?

Perhaps "I think I’ve had my piece of bad luck for today."

Ann225‘bad stroke of luck’

Originally you wrote "stroke of bad luck". "bad stroke of luck" seems a less natural word order to me.

Oh I’m so sorry. I don’t know why I wrote it that way.
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1) should be: "I had a stroke of bad luck today. Everything that could possibly have gone wrong did."

anonymous

1) should be: "I had a stroke of bad luck today. Everything that could possibly have gone wrong did."

This does not have quite the same meaning as the original sentence.

GPY has a point. But you can't pair "stroke of bad luck" with "nothing else can go wrong" like this. You'd have to say something like:


"I've had more than my share of bad luck today. Nothing else can possibly go wrong."

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