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A student of mine is very good in his studies so I usually do not work hard after explaining him so can I say?

Mr X is very good at his studies it seems like I do not have to work hard after him to get him score good marks in his exam.

Miss Y is not a very good student it appears I will have to work very hard explaining things to her.


Is it the correct usage of "after".


Please correct my sentences and state some alternatives as well.

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First of all, both sentences are run-on sentences. You have put one independent statement after another, without any words or punctuation to either join them or separate them. You cannot do this in English. I think that that you make this mistake quite often. To fix this, either start a new sentence, or use an appropriate linking word such as "and". If you make this correction, your second example is correct. E.g.:

Miss Y is not a very good student. It appears I will have to work very hard explaining things to her.

In your first example, the phrase "work hard after him" is not correct, and I am not sure exactly what you mean. Can you explain in some other terms what you mean by "after him"?

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I make run on sentences but not intentionally, it is because I have very less knowledge about speaking and writing English.


Here after him means for him means I have to work very hard for him or to explain things to her.

Is there any other sentences to describe my intention? Can I say


It looks like I will have to work very hard to make you learn and understand the different aspects/elements of your studies.

Liton DasI make run-on sentences but not intentionally. It is because ...

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Liton DasHere after him means for him means I have to work very hard for him or to explain things to her.

I don't see that you need the word "after" or anything particularly to replace it. You can simply say:

Mr X is very good at his studies. It seems like/that I won't have to work hard after him to get him to score good marks in his exam.

"like" is informal. More formally, use "that".

Liton DasIt looks like / as if I will have to work very hard to make you learn and understand the different aspects/elements of your studies.

This is acceptable. Again, "like" is informal.

Ok so I can't use "after him" or "for him" even though they mean different in this context.
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Liton Das Ok so I can't use "after him" or "for him" even though they mean different in this context.

"work hard after him" is hard to understand in your context.

"work hard for him" is not totally impossible in your context. However, this phrase would typically be used in a situation where he is your boss or superior, so I would not fully recommend it.