+1
is it 'at the test' or 'in the test'? Is 'failing at the test' a prepositional phrase?

Thanks!
1 2
Comments  
nerdikarpis it 'at the test' or 'in the test'? neither
The students (failing)(who failed) the test are upset.

Is 'failing at the test' a prepositional phrase? No, "failing" is an adjective.

Thanks!
c45

The students (failing)(who failed) the test are upset.

I don't think "failing " is an option in this sentence. Students are upset becasue they "failed" which is after the test.

Failing , to me, functions as a present participle which is not the appropriate choice. Just my two cents.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
dimsumexpressThe students (failing)(who failed) the test are upset. I don't think "failing " is an option in this sentence. Students are upset becasue they "failed" which is after the test. Yes, that is a likely situation, but it could be a multiple-part test or an ongoing test and so far some students are failing. So since what the poster wrote is not definitely wrong, we can't ignore it
Additionally, "failing" is also used even after the test is over and the results are known. So, it can have the same meaning as "who failed".

If I am not mistaken, this type of sentence structure can be a trap for those who are trying to learn.
canadian45Yes, that is a likely situation, but it could be a multiple-part test or an ongoing test and so far some students are failing. So since what the poster wrote is not definitely wrong, we can't ignore it
Additionally, "failing" is also used even after the test is over and the results are known. So, it can have the same meaning as "who failed".
But taken what you gave as an example and its face value, you could be correct that this test may be a multiple part process; If this is the original text.

I think you are likely to agree that when to use " present participle" as adverbial is not a clean-cut answer. There are certain verbs that are just ackward being used that way.

i.e. The dentist working on my teeth last week died yesterday. vs The dentist who worked on my teeth last week died yesterday. This is a similar structure to the "failing" example, even though the core of the meaning got across, the syntactical element using "working" in this context didn't seem to fit; well, to me anyway. However, if I used this example, it would work fine:

My boss, feeling sick all week but still going to work; trying to complete this merger deal, had finally collapsed at the meeting this morning. Note that I placed a comma after "boss".
dimsumexpressI think you are likely to agree that when to use " present participle" as adverbial is not a clean-cut answer.
"failing" is not adverbial.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
canadian45
dimsumexpressI think you are likely to agree that when to use " present participle" as adverbial is not a clean-cut answer.
"failing" is not adverbial.
Well, yes, "failing" by itself is is a present participle and had no adverbial property, but "failing the test...." is.

Students are upset. The reason is, failing the test.
Dear nerdikarp,

We usually fail a subject means we recieve an academic grade below the acceptable minimum

E.g: I failed algebra twice.

Hope it works

Iman
dimsumexpressI Well, yes, "failing" by itself is is a present participle and had no adverbial property, but "failing the test.." is. I don't agree.
Students are upset. The reason is, failing the test.

Students failing the test are upset.

The underlined part is the subject of the sentence. "failing the test" is an adjective phrase giving information about the students. "are" is the only verb in the sentence. "upset" is an adjective; grammarians call it a subject complement.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more