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Hello

What's the difference among "study" "learn" and "work"

there's the sentence: I CAN'T GO TO THE CINEMA TODAY; I HAVE TO STAY AT HOME AND STUDY

What if I changed the last word into LEARN or WORK, would it change the meaning? Are they interchangeable in this context?

thank you
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Meanings would change. Study is the pursuit of knowledge. Learning is the acquisition of knowledge. Work is the utilization of effort. We do not normally use 'learn' without an object, and the activity is hopeful at best: it is an autonomic function of our brain, not something we can will to do. I want to learn Spanish, so I study it every night; it is a lot of hard work!
Hi Micawber!

One more thing. According to my manual the right word in the sentence I wrote should be "work" not "study," i.e. I CAN'T GO TO THE CINEMA TODAY; I HAVE TO STAY AT HOME AND WORK

Do you agree?

cheers
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Not at all-- study and work fit equally well into the sentence.
I usually describe "study" as getting the knowledge by yourself and "learning" as acquiring the knowledge with someone else's help.
That is a misapprehension, Loojka. We study in order to learn, whether it be alone or under someone else.
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study - to seriously and deliberately attempt to acquire knowledge in a formal manner.

learn - to acquire knowledge.

You could study without learning much (reminds me of those desperate night-before-the-exams cramming sessions). A child learns to do many things without studying them. You study at school and hope that you learn something. Sometimes I learn a lot when I read a novel, but I'm not studying.