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Unless advised to evacuate, stay at home if your house is sturdy. If it's not, move to a designated shelter and stay there until the storm is over.

Is "sturdy" synonymous with "strong; firm?' Thanks.
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AngliholicUnless advised to evacuate, stay at home if your house is sturdy. If it's not, move to a designated shelter and stay there until the storm is over.

Is "sturdy" synonymous with "strong; firm?' Thanks.

I would say they are synonymous.
Angliholic
Unless advised to evacuate, stay at home if your house is sturdy. If it's not, move to a designated shelter and stay there until the storm is over.

Is "sturdy" synonymous with "strong; firm?' Thanks.

Just a few thoughts on these adjectives...

A "strong" opinion is one that is overpowering, and often perceived as "biased". A "strong" foundation is a solid base, i.e. as in a house. But a strong house sound odd to me. A house can be described as "strongly built" but not a strong house.

A "Firm" understanding on something does not equal to a "strong understanding" technically speaking. Firm weighs less than strong.

But it would sound odd if we say " a sturdy understanding". Sturdy is usually used to describe something structural or built, i.e. bookcase, a house, any framework or a table etc...

Each of the adjectives discussed has a subtle application as to when and how it's used.

A strong body/ opinion sounds fine while a "strong table / car" will sound weird.

Likewise, a firm ab/ buttuck sound perfectly fine but "strong" just doesn't sound right.