Since I am here by invitation ( unusual in Usenet groups )I thought that I might ask a question.
A stutter is pretty well established as a nervous problem in some people and tends to go along with a reserved and unsocial personality.

On the other hand a stammer tends to be found in quite high status people.

I wonder if anybody here has a evidence for either of these ideas.

"They cooked him on the Nine Stane Rig
And a grand brothe they made on't,
And had his gear and beasts awa'
His good wife and his daughters twa,
He, 'twas salt tae the broth they made on't.
- Scotch ballad, quoted by George MacDonald Fraser in 'The Candlemass Road' * TagZilla 0.057 * http://tagzilla.mozdev.org
Since I am here by invitation ( unusual in Usenet groups )I thought that I might ask a question.

Who invited you and on what authority? EMWTK.
A stutter is pretty well established as a nervous problem in some people and tends to go along with a ... be found in quite high status people. I wonder if anybody here has a evidence for either of these ideas.

Why contrast "a reserved and unsocial personality" with "high status"? The two don't seem to me to be mutually exclusive. Obaue: "a" evidence?
"They cooked him on the Nine Stane Rig And a grand brothe they made on't, And had his gear ... they made on't. - Scotch ballad, quoted by George MacDonald Fraser in 'The Candlemass Road' * TagZilla 0.057 * http://tagzilla.mozdev.org

I have noticed that the content of your .sig sometimes exceeds that of the associated post in terms of number of words. The content of your .sig frequently exceeds that of your post in terms of interest. I am, however, puzzled as to why anyone would attach an automated .sig to posts, since the contents bear no relevance to the post or the poster as far as I can see.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Since I am here by invitation ( unusual in Usenet groups )I thought that I might ask a question.

What is the ratio, would you say, between those who have invited you to those who wish you'd bugger off? Would 1:80 be a fair estimate?
A stutter is pretty well established as a nervous problem in some people

Sure
and tends to go along with a reserved and unsocial personality.

Not true. I've known some highly social stutterers.
On the other hand a stammer tends to be found in quite high status people. I wonder if anybody here has a evidence for either of these ideas.

Your ideas. It's up to you to provide the 'evidence'.
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A stutter is pretty well established as a nervous problem ... anybody here has a evidence for either of these ideas.

Why contrast "a reserved and unsocial personality" with "highstatus"? The two don't seem to me to be mutually exclusive. Obaue: "a" evidence?

And who on earth said there was a difference between a stammer and a stutter? I grant, though, that it may sometimes have been heard as an affectation in certain circles, but I don't think the habit has survived.

Mike.
Since I am here by invitation ( unusual in Usenet groups )I thought that I might ask a question. A stutter is pretty well established as a nervous problem in some people and tends to go along with a reserved and unsocial personality.

That's funny ,but three of the worst stutterers I know are very forceful and outgoing people.
Since I am here by invitation ( unusual in Usenet ... tends to go along with a reserved and unsocial personality.

That's funny ,but three of the worst stutterers I know are very forceful and outgoing people.

It isn't funny, it is an interesting datum.

Secretly I have always held the opinion that it would be less depressing to be alcoholic than to be anonymous- Quinten Crisp, Resident Alien * TagZilla 0.057 * http://tagzilla.mozdev.org
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I am, however, puzzled as to why anyone would attach an automated .sig to posts, since the contents bear no relevance to the post or the poster as far as I can see.

Er... doesn't Evan do that?

Robin