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In 1990, in a town called Tortosa was founded the Special Education School "Gloria S.", sharing different spaces and activities with the Centre for Education...

Does the inversion sound weird? Should I use an introductory 'it'?

Thanks
Comments  
it sounds fine, however, I would change the comma and would use a relative clause:

In 1990, in a town called Tortosa, was founded the Special Education School "Gloria S." which shared different spaces and activities with the Centre for Education...
rafaelinrioit sounds fine, however, I would change the comma and would use a relative clause:

In 1990, in a town called Tortosa, was founded the Special Education School "Gloria S." which shared different spaces and activities with the Centre for Education...

I would avoid the comma before 'was'. Never split the S V with a comma. The first comma in the sentence separates the prepositional phrase from the sentence, but the second is incorrect. Also, I assume it was a typo of yours to have a period before 'which'?

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Hi,

How do two schools 'share different spaces'? It sounds odd. Perhaps you mean 'share various spaces'?

Clive
English 1b3I would avoid the comma before 'was'. Never split the S V with a comma.
Please note that Special Education School "Gloria S." is the subject, and reread the sentence. After that, I think you'll have a different opinion about the comma and the S V structure.

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CJ
Yes, no S V splitted by the comma, because it's a subject inversion. In fact that was my original question, whether the inversion sounded right.

And yes, there's a typo in"Gloria S."

I can see the problem with "different" as well. I've changed it for various. That's was because my mothertongue was messing around.

Then, appart from the comma and the adjective "different", does the sentence sound right?
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I"d suggest changing "sharing" to "which shared."

The inversion is not very natural here. It creates a "once up a time, there lived a young girl named Cinderella" feel to it, as though you are telling a fairy tale. Were you attempting to create that feeling?
In fact no, but as I wanted to mention the name of the town and the year first, I came up with the inversion.

Then, do you suggest using an introductory it:
"it was founded the Special Education School Gloria S, which shared..."?

Or how would you put it? Because doesn't this other version also strike you as a little weird?