+0

Dear all

I would like to ask for your favor.

Could a complete sentence be a subject of a clause?

Here is a full sentence:

(1) That Rangers won both matches was a great achievement.

"That Rangers won both matches" is a complete sentence. It serve as subject of above sentence.

Is that (1) sentence structured correctly?

Many thanks in advance.

+1
LE HANH 2383Could a complete sentence be a subject of a clause?

No. It's the other way around. Your sentence (below) is a case where a complete clause is the subject of a sentence.

That Rangers won both matches || was || a great achievement.

CJ

+0

1) "That Rangers won both matches" is NOT a complete sentence. (it's a subordinate cluse.)

2) "Rangers won both matches" is a complete sentence.

Clive

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  

I would expect That the Rangers won both matches was a great achievement. The subject is the underlined content clause, which is not a main clause but a type of subordinate clause, as marked by the subordinator that.


It's a correct sentence, but not one you're likely to hear a native speaker actually say. You will occasionally come across this structure in writing, though.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Dear lOvVraTESsS1110/CJ

If I omit the word "that" and rewrite sentence as follows:

The Rangers won both matches was a great achievement


Above sentence is not correct? and It must have "That" to make a whole sentence correct?

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
LE HANH 2383The Rangers won both matches was a great achievement. The above sentence is not correct? and It must have "That" to make a whole sentence correct?

Right. The subordinating word that can't be dropped in content clauses functioning as subject, because without it the subject reads like a main clause, and main clauses can't be subjects. (A main clause is also called an independent clause.)

Dear lOvVraTESsS1110

Many thanks for your support.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

By the way, "Rangers" with no article is how they put it in the UK.