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During my recent trip through western Canada, I came across a number of people who used 'him/her' as the subject pronoun when used in a compound subject: "him and his uncle arrived later"; "him and his son did such-and-such"; "her and her friends had tea at the Banff Springs Hotel".

I can't say that I never heard what I would call the correct form, but the shock of hearing this from supposedy educated, articulate speakers (tour guide, RCMP officer) made me wonder if it is more common in Canada than in the U.S. (And, come to think of it, I have a couple of friends in Vancouver who use it quite regularly.) I'm hoping it isn't considered to be "correct".

Thanks to Clive and others for their opinions.
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During my recent trip through western Canada, I came across a number of people who used 'him/her' as the subject pronoun when used in a compound subject: "him and his uncle arrived later"; "him and his son did such-and-such"; "her and her friends had tea at the Banff Springs Hotel".

I would consider the above usage wrong. From all the books I've read, this usage is never the correct form.

I believe this is only used when speaking, not when writing.


It seems to me that I've heard that construction here in the U.S. from time to time, but all in all, quite rarely. Maybe they were visitors from Canada? Emotion: smile

Afterthought: Can it be the influence of French?

Lui et son amie, ils sont ... [Not Il]

CJ
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CalifJimIt seems to me that I've heard that construction here in the U.S. from time to time, but all in all, quite rarely. Maybe they were visitors from Canada? Emotion: smile

Afterthought: Can it be the influence of French?

Lui et son amie, ils sont ... [Not Il]

CJ

Possibly, but only the Mountie knew any French (bilingual from birth).
It's very common in BrE, from all kinds of speaker.

And sometimes a speaker who says "him and his brother did X" will not be averse to a "now it's up to you and I".

MrP
MrPedanticIt's very common in BrE, from all kinds of speaker.

And sometimes a speaker who says "him and his brother did X" will not be averse to a "now it's up to you and I".

MrP
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Hi Philip

I think the use of sentences such as "Him and his brother went fishing" must be a bit more common in my neck of the woods than in yours. Not everyone would use an object pronoun as a subject, but it wouldn't really surprise me at all to hear it.
In Singapore, many students write "I went to the market" but "My mother and me went to the market." Similarly, they write "My brother went to the market with my mother and I.", but "My brother went to the market with me." Even some educated speakers make similar mistakes. I just don't understand why.
Hi Philip,

I can't say that I've ever noticed this as being a widespread usage in Canada, but then I suppose a fish doesn't notice water, does it?

I guess the Mountie wasn't one of Canada's fabled grammar police then? Emotion: smile

Clive
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