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Please limit your answers to events and experiences that have taken place since January. (How do I say the subject for this sentence? Can I use anyone of the following? Look below.)

I know every sentence has one subject, so which one do I use? And could you explain the differences between the two sentences? I know they are both grammatically correct but I can't tell when to use 'is' or 'are' for this case.

1. The subject is events and experiences for this sentence.

2. The subjects are events and experiences for this sentence. (For the latter part of the sentence, it is describing the subject right? So does it make more sense to use the plural 'subjects' instead of 'subject' ?)

Thanks!!

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Comments  
Actually, Jack, the subject of this sentence is the implied you, and the verb is limit, as in-- [You] please limit your answers.

If the sentence had been written, "Events and experiences have taken place since January", then you could write (and punctuate), "The subject of this sentence is 'events and experiences', and the verb is 'have taken place'". If you were speaking and not writing, you can still say "The subject is events and experiences."
Hi Jack,

Yes, I agree with Davkett.

Another way of putting it is to say that the imperative form does not have a subject (except for the implicit 'you'.) Consider something simple like 'Help!' or 'Put up your hands!'

Best wishes, Clive
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2. The subjects are events and experiences for this sentence. (So don't use this one? Or it doesn't matter if I use #1 or #2? Which one would you use? Would it be #1 because every sentence has only one subject?)

Thanks
Hi again, Jack,

Please limit your answers to events and experiences that have taken place since January.

Do you understand that this sentence has no subject?

Best wishes, Clive
Clive
Hi again, Jack,

Please limit your answers to events and experiences that have taken place since January.

Do you understand that this sentence has no subject?

Best wishes, Clive

Yes I understand that sentence. Subject is implied. It is like a 'command' (eg. Give me the ball!) but I still don't understand if I should use 'subjects' or 'subject' ?

Thanks!
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Hi again,

Why do you want to talk about 'subject or subjects' when the sentence doesn't have any subject?

Clive
Jack, let me further explain my post above--

If you have more than one noun in the subject of a sentence, like this, "Dogs, cats, and hamsters make good pets for children", you will say--when speaking about grammatical structure: "The subject of the sentence is 'dogs, cats, and hamsters', and the verb is 'make'. You do not say, "The subjects of the sentence are 'dogs, cats, and hamsters', and the verb is 'make'."
CliveHi again, Jack,

Please limit your answers to events and experiences that have taken place since January.

Do you understand that this sentence has no subject?

Best wishes, Clive
With respect, the sentence consists of two clauses, a main clause and a subordinate relative clause. That introduces the relative clause and is the subject of the clause.
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