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....And you may say you don't enjoy a good ol' "Silent Night" sing-along, but it's popular carols like that which continue to help spread the deepest meaning of Christmas.

I think there are some grammar mistakes that have to do with subject-verb agreement in the sentence above.

....but it's a popular carol like that which continues to...

How does it sound now? Please advise.

LCChang
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Lcchang....And you may say you don't enjoy a good ol' "Silent Night" sing-along, but it's popular carols like that which continue to help spread the deepest meaning of Christmas.

I think there are some grammar mistakes that have to do with subject-verb agreement in the sentence above.

....but it's a popular carol like that which continues to...
Hi Lcchang

English isn't the most exact of languages and therefore people may understand your sentence differently. As I see it, it is used to emphasise what continues to help spread the deepest meaning of Christmas (= popular carols like that). In other words, it doesn't refer to "Silent Night" at all. Similar examples:

It was those boys that/who broke the window yesterday.
It was yesterday that those boys broke the window.
It was the window that those boys broke yesterday.

Cheers
CB
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The it is "dummy it" of a cleft structure.

For more on cleft sentences, see "It's the little things that bring me the most joy.".

CJ
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Comments  
The original version is right, and so is your version.

carols continue
they continue

a carol continues
it continues
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Cool Breeze
Lcchang....And you may say you don't enjoy a good ol' "Silent Night" sing-along, but it's popular carols like that which continue to help spread the deepest meaning of Christmas.

I think there are some grammar mistakes that have to do with subject-verb agreement in the sentence above.

....but it's a popular carol like that which continues to...

Hi Lcchang

English isn't the most exact of languages and therefore people may understand your sentence differently. As I see it, it is used to emphasise what continues to help spread the deepest meaning of Christmas (= popular carols like that). In other words, it doesn't refer to "Silent Night" at all. Similar examples:

It was those boys that/who broke the window yesterday.
It was yesterday that those boys broke the window.
It was the window that those boys broke yesterday.

Cheers
CB
Oh I see. That makes sense. Thanks.

LCChang