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Hi

I am wondering what to do when quantity precedes the antecedent in an adjective clause.

e.g.

1. Each of the dancers that was/were dancing yesterday have/has come to the school.

2. I know one of the critics that like/likes this movie.

One one hand, I think the verb should agree with dancers/critics because they are the antecedents preceding the adjective clause.

On the other hand, each of an one of are always taken as singular.

Which way do you think is correct?
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Equilibrium81. Each of the dancers that was/were dancing yesterday have/has come to the school.
2. I know one of the critics that like/likes this movie.
As shown.

The dancers were dancing.
Each has come to the school.
The critics like this movie.

CJ
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Hello, Equilibrium-- and welcome to English Forums. These are correct:

1. Each of the dancers that were dancing yesterday has come to the school.
2a. I know one of the critics who like this movie. (Several critics like it.)
2b. I know one of the critics, who likes this movie. (One critic likes it.)
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Thanks! So, if I want to apply the rule to other examples; the adjective clause needs to agree with antecedent dancers, while has agrees with the quantity?
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I'd have to see other examples: I cannot visualize clearly that what you say is universal.