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Hello everyone,

I have some trouble with recognizing subject-verb agreement in cases where the verb occurs in the sub-ordinate clause and refers back to a noun/subject in the main clause

For instance could you please let me know which of the following sentences is correct.

1)In good years, the patchwork of green fields that surround the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many of them in the area just for the season.

OR

2)In good years, the patchwork of green fields that surrounds the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many of whom are in the area just for the season.

For 1) sorround in the dependent clause seems to refer back to 'greenfields' in the main clause.

For 2) sorrounds in the dependent clause seems to refer back to 'patchwork' in the main clause.

However verb 'bustles' in both sentences seems to refer back to 'patchwork'.

As written which of the following sentences is more correct. Are both grammatically correct.

Is there any rule in English grammar which would allow us to choose the correct subject b/w patchwork and greenfields. Does the fact that "greenfields" occurs in a prepositional phrase matter?

Thanks very much.
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There is no way of knowing for sure whether the writer wished the patchwork or the fields to surround, but the verbs sound odd unless the same in concord; I would choose the singular: surrounds and bustles.
Comments  
Thanks very much.

I too thought that 'sorrounds' and 'bustles' seemed correct. Since both refer to one subject:patchwork.