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Every and any usualy take a singular verb as in

  • Every car has been (not have been) tested.
If a sentence has a pronoun which refers to a previous noun that has been introduced by every or any, should we use a singular verb or a plural verb.

  • Every car (has been or have been) tested for its breaks.
GB
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Grammarian-bot Singular.

Every and any usualy take a singular verb as in

  • Every car has been (not have been) tested.
If a sentence has a pronoun which refers to a previous noun that has been introduced by every or any, should we use a singular verb or a plural verb.

  • Every car (has been or have been) tested for its breaks.
GB
Singular.
Every car has been tested for its brakes (not breaks).
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Every car has been (not have been) tested.

Shouldn't it be Every car has not been tested? Instead of not has been tested... ? I mean, when forming the negative
Katarinka

Every car has been (not have been) tested.

Shouldn't it be Every car has not been tested? Instead of not has been tested... ? I mean, when forming the negative

Every car has not been tested. You're right.

Every car has been (not have been) tested.

This means:
We should use Every car has been tested, and we should not use Every car have been tested.

The negative not in the quote box refers to using has been and not using have been.
It does not refer to forming a negative sentence.

However, if you want the negative of Every car has been tested, you need Not every car has been tested.

CJ
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Jim,

You say 'However, if you want the negative of Every car has been tested, you need Not every car has been tested.'

You're correct. I overlook that aspect of grammar.

The negative of Every car has been tested should be Not every car has been tested.
Yoong Liat
Katarinka

Every car has been (not have been) tested.

Shouldn't it be Every car has not been tested? Instead of not has been tested... ? I mean, when forming the negative

Every car has not been tested. You're right.

What CJ said is correct. Although 'has not been tested' is correct, the negative of Every car has been tested should be Not every car has been tested.

Well guys, looks like every one here goes witha singular verb but American Heritage says it should be have. Actually I saw this sentence in Americam Heritage but couldn't figure out why is it so.

Following is the passage;


Every is representative of a large class of English words and expressions that are singular in form but felt to be plural in sense. The class includes, for example, noun phrases introduced by every, any, and certain uses of some. These expressions invariably take a singular verb; we say Every car has (not have) been tested. Anyone is (not are) liable to fall ill. But when a sentence contains a pronoun that refers to a previous noun phrase introduced by every, grammar and sense pull in different directions. The grammar of these expressions requires a singular pronoun, as in Every car must have its brakes tested, but the meaning often leads people to use the plural pronoun, as in Every car must have their brakes tested. The use of plural pronouns in such cases is common in speech, but it is still widely regarded as incorrect in writing.
Please explain why it says "every car must have its brakes tested".

GB
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