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Hi, everyone. I have a question about the tense in the usage of "should" in subordinate clauses. Please look at the sentences below:

I'm surprised that you should be so foolish. (Does it mean "I feel surprised that you are so foolish."?)

I was surprised that you should have been so foolish. (Does it mean "I felt surprised that you were so foolish."?)

I'm surprised that you should have been so foolish.(Does it mean "I feel surprised that you were so foolish."?)

Please help me solve my doubt, thank you!
Comments  
Yes for all, IMO, but only in a first approximation.
To many, esp in such contexts, should brings in an element of chance, thus more accurate readings would IMO be:
I'm surprised that you should be so foolish. ("I feel surprised that you happen to be so foolish."?
I was surprised that you should have been so foolish. (Does it mean "I felt surprised that you happened to be so foolish."?)
I'm surprised that you should have been so foolish.(Does it mean "I feel surprised that you happened to be so foolish."?)
Thanks for your accurate interpretation.
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Palmer (The English Verb) calls this 'evaluative' should. It has the same meaning as when the non-modal form is used, according to Palmer.
I'm surprised that you [should be / are] so foolish.
And so on.
CJ
> Palmer (The English Verb) calls this 'evaluative' should.
Jim, you quoted this much Palmer that I ordered it. It better be goodEmotion: smile
Palmer and Levin are two of my bibles. Emotion: smile

CJ
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CalifJim Palmer (The English Verb) calls this 'evaluative' should. It has the same meaning as when the non-modal form is used, according to Palmer.
I'm surprised that you [should be / are] so foolish.
George Curme doesn't seem to agree with Palmer:
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The past subjunctive is often used instead of the present indicative since the abstract principle is felt as more important than the concrete fact:
I regard it as the saddest of things that a man should be allowed to bring up his son in that way.
A Grammar of the English Language, by George Curme, vol II, p. 417
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and Curme's very detailed on the subjunctive.