+0

I received a cheque on a date subsequent to it's receipt/original date.

What does it mean, is there any other ways to utter that?

+0

What is the "receipt/original date"? Do you mean the date that is written on the cheque itself?

1 2
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Suppose I were to receive a cheque on 18th August but I received on 20th aug so in that case can I say the above sentence?
Liton Das Suppose I were to receive a cheque on 18th August but I received on 20th aug

I assume you mean you were due to receive it on 18th August. That was the date that it should have arrived.

Liton Dasin that case can I say the above sentence?

No, it is not clear. You can say e.g.:

I received the cheque two days late.
The cheque arrived two days late.
The cheque was due to arrive on 18th August, but I did not receive it until 20th August.

("arrive(d)" is appropriate if you received the cheque through the post, but not if it was e.g. handed to you.)

Please read 3 no then what does it mean?

WRITE DESCRIPTION HERE
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

I were due to......


I don't understand the usage or meaning of "due to" here, I thought it means "because of" please can you explain? And in what circumstances can we use this expression?

Liton DasPlease read 3 no then what does it mean?

How can something be received on a date subsequent to its receipt? It makes no sense to me. My guess is that this has been written incorrectly and should in fact say:

When a check ... is deposited into the bank account on a date subsequent to its receipt ...

Liton DasI don't understand the usage or meaning of "due to" here, I thought it means "because of" please can you explain? And in what circumstances can we use this expression?

When it is followed by a noun or noun phrase, "due to" means "because of" or (more strictly speaking) "caused by". For example: "The delays were due to the bad weather".

In my sentence, "due to" is followed by a verb ("receive"). This is different altogether. In this case "due to" describes what is/was planned to happen, or expected to happen. For example, "We are due to arrive in London at 6 pm".

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Does it mean I received the check today and I deposit it after 2 days or tomorrow is that what you mean?

Do you see march 4 and 5 entry in the screenshot this is what no 3 point from earlier screenshot was all about.


Please help a little on this. I were to receive or I were due to receive. I don't see the difference?


WRITE DESCRIPTION HERE
Show more