+0
(1) Margarine can substitute for butter in this recipe.

(2) Butter can be substituted with margarine in this recipe.

(3) Margarine can be substituted for butter in this recipe.

Can all these sentences be read as “margarine can take the place of butter in this recipe.”?

Instead of active/passive voice, is the preposition the mainest factor to determine the direction of relationship? Are there many verbs like “substitute” in this regard?

Thank you.
1 2 3
Comments  (Page 3) 
MilkyOr by a better dictionary. Emotion: wink
Hi, Milky, I assure you your sense of humour deserves winning a page of a better one. Emotion: big smile

Goodman wrote:

… A lot of English materials we write and read are subject to the interpretation of the person who has learned, perhaps, from different teachers at different places and time. …

Thank you for your response. Emotion: smile

Your comment corresponds to CJ’s signature which says “there are no facts, only interpretations”
"I haven't been funny enough to win another, yet." This is funny.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
<Your comment corresponds to CJ’s signature which says “there are no facts, only interpretations” >

Yes, I agree. That's why I responded to Clive's "'with' is substandard" comment in Post :248785.
I agree with CalifJim and Clive -- when I see"carrots have been substituted with peas" I have no idea which i am going to get! [:^)] I would advise sticking with "substitute for" or "replace with" and avoid "substitute with" if you want your meaning to be clear. "Substituted with" drives me crazy!!
Khoff
I would advise sticking with "substitute for" or "replace with" and avoid "substitute with" if you want your meaning to be clear. "Substituted with" drives me crazy!!

It is clear for millions of native speakers.

Psst! Ask an American to stick to the present perfect when asking if I've seen a film that is still in the movie theaters - if he/she wants his/her meaning to be clear for all native speakers that is. "Did you see Heading South" drives me crazy!

Emotion: stick out tongue
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Ask an American to stick to the present perfect when asking if I've seen a film that is still in the movie theaters - if he/she wants his/her meaning to be clear for all native speakers that is. "Did you see Heading South" drives me crazy!

Huh? What's wrong with asking in the simple past? Do you think that only "Have you seen..." is acceptable?
I don't accept it, but that's me.
if the waiter tells me that carrots are substituted with peas tonight, I won't know which is substituted for which.
Me neither. It's not a combination of words I'm comfortable with.
I'd probably tell the waiter that I don't carrot all and to go away and leave me in peas. Emotion: big smile

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.