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Granny Peach suffered from a tragedy losing family members to suicide. Most of us would have lived in pain and sorrow, but Granny chooses love and courage instead.

Is it better with or without "from" here? If both sound right, are they different in meaning? Thanks.
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It certainly reads wrong to me. Granny now suffers from the tragedy; she suffered the tragedy when it occurred.
Mister MicawberIt certainly reads wrong to me. Granny now suffers from the tragedy; she suffered the tragedy when it occurred.

Thank you, Mister Micawber, for the consideration.

But why not "Granny now suffers (pain) from the tragedy?" Would you mind clearing up my confusion in a few words?
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Put pain in the sentence, then: Granny now suffers pain from the tragedy.

Mister MicawberPut pain in the sentence, then: Granny now suffers pain from the tragedy.

Thanks again, Mister.

I think I get it. But what does "suffered the tragedy" refer to? I think "suffered" here is different in meaning from the one in "suffers pain from the tragedy."

Is it "had/met with the tradegy?"
Yes, that's the idea: suffer + noun = experience (something unfortunate); undergo or be subjected to.
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Thanks, Mister.