+0
HI there...I wanted you guys to take a look at these two sentences bellow and tell me which one is correct, in case there is one, or just rephrase it and tell me the best way to express the idea. I believe the second one is ok, but I don't know about the first one. In theory, to suggest, functioning as a transitive verb, means that the subject suggest about the object....and not something to the object (like in the intransitive way...suggest to somebody that...)...anyway, let me know if whether you think both the first and second could be used this way to convey the same.

She suggested her students to continue being linked to the same ones as last year...

She suggested whether her students could continue being linked to the same ones as last year...

Thanks,

Fran
1 2
Comments  
Hello Franmonaj

I think the English verb "suggest" is a bit tough to learn to us learners. In my mother tongue the verb equivalent to "suggest" and that to "advise" are used almost the same way. But in English "suggest" seems much weaker in 'to-person transitivity' than "advise". "Suggest" can't take a person as its object directly (i.e., without use of 'to'). "He suggested to me that I should learn English" is theoretically correct but sounds stiff. On the other hand, "He suggested me that I should learn English" is absolutely wrong, despite of the fact that we can say "He advised me that I should learn English". Another queer feature of "suggest" is that this verb cannot take an infinitive clause as its object. So "He suggested to learn English" is wrong, though we can say "He suggested learning English". We can say "He advised me to learn English" but "He suggested me to learn English" is completely wrong.

As for your second sentence, my dictionary suggests "suggest whether" is a right construct. However, I feel "suggest that" is more natural in your context.

paco
Hi Paco,

Just a couple of further comments.

I think the English verb "suggest" is a bit tough to learn to us learners. Are you being ironic here?

"He suggested to me that I should learn English" is theoretically correct but sounds stiff. Yes. Less stiff and more natural in speaking is "He suggested I learn English"

As for your second sentence, my dictionary suggests "suggest whether" is a right construct. However, I feel "suggest that" is more natural in your context. "Suggest whether" is dead wrong.

Best wishes, Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi again guys...

Im not trying to use suggest here as "advise". I know, if you want to convey that, you have to use it this way "He suggested to me that I should look for another job" or "I suggest (that) you look for another job"...rather than that, rather than advising anyone to do something, she is trying to propose something....to mention something...this format of sentence:

Valerie Plame suggested her husband be sent to Niger. ...

In this example, she is not giving advice to her husband, she just propose sending her husband somewhere....

That's the structure and sense I'm trying to transmit on "She suggested her students to continue being linked to the same ones"...Is it possible to make any arrangements to this so it can express the meaning I'm talking about?

I know if I use the "suggestions" (hehe) you guys are giving me here I can make it up otherwise, such as: "she suggested linking her students to last year's again", but I still want to know if that could be a valid sentence (in that sense) or what type of changes could we make for that to work out.

Thanks,

Fran
Hi,

Im not trying to use suggest here as "advise". I know, if you want to convey that, you have to use it this way "He suggested to me that I should look for another job" or "I suggest (that) you look for another job"...rather than that, rather than advising anyone to do something, she is trying to propose something....to mention something...this format of sentence:

Valerie Plame suggested her husband be sent to Niger. ...

In this example, she is not giving advice to her husband, she just propose sending her husband somewhere....

Oh, I see. Sorry. I guess we went rushing off down the wrong road!

That's the structure and sense I'm trying to transmit on "She suggested her students to continue being linked to the same ones"...Is it possible to make any arrangements to this so it can express the meaning I'm talking about?

I'd just say "She suggested her students continue to be linked to the same ones". (I don't kno who or what 'the same ones' are, but I guess that's not important here) .

Best wishes, Clive
By the way...

Are you guys sure "suggest whether" is wrong?I believe that can be used to clarify the real meaning of the sentence. Actually, try to look it up into google as "suggest whether"...you'd be surprised...you get around 70.000 entries!

Look at this Clive, do you really thing is that wrong?

Suggest whether the corporate manslaughter should be made into a statutory offence.

Thanks,

Fran
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks so much Clive!!!!

I'd just say "She suggested her students continue to be linked to the same ones". (I don't kno who or what 'the same ones' are, but I guess that's not important here)

Yessss, this is the kind of clarification I was looking for!! You are right, the last part doesnt concern me much...it was the relation verb/object and final meaning. I wasnt so sure I could use that way without a bit structural change.

Thanks again,

Fran
Hello Fran

"Suggest whether" when "suggest" means "propose" doesn't make a great deal of sense to me; though as you say, people do seem to use it.

But "suggest whether" when "suggest" means "indicate" is fine, e.g.

1. Sometimes, however, the type of debt itself will suggest whether it is secured.

MrP
Hello Fran

I said "suggest someone to do" is wrong and "suggest whether" is weird in your context. "Something suggests whether A or B" is used commonly to mean "Something can judge whether A or B".

If you don't like my reply, I don't care about it anyway. But please don't write back in too big letters. You don't need to do so. I can read anything that is written in letters of a normal size.

paco
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more