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Voting a legislation in the House of the Parliament.

The Speaker or the Lord Speaker is the person who officially controls the meetings and discussions. He isn’t allowed to give any advantages to any particular parts and announces the winner side. The Speaker can call all the members for a vote in case if his decision is challenged by Lords or Commons. After the bell rings, members of the House of Commons have 8 minutes to gather together in the chosen lobby.

In the House of Lords there is a Content Lobby and a Not Content Lobby. And the Commons are divided their lobbies into Aye and No. The both Houses lobbies run across the sides of the main Chamber. In the Commons, MPs walk through either the Ayes or Noes Lobby, according to their voting intention. After the members names are recorded as the file past Clerk, the list of how the MPs voted becomes public and also takes the part of the official parliamentary report.

The Content lobby of the House of Lords.

The process of law making is roughly the same in both houses. However, if the division happens in Content lobby of the House of Lords, members will have their name recorded at temporary division desks. Each member is filled in alphabetically. The final result of the voting is announced in Chamber.

Bill is being read out in the Chamber by the Clerk. It is the first stage of reading where Bills are introduced. Then comes a second reading, the debate is opened. After second reading the Bill goes to committee stage where detailed examination of the Bill happens. Then the bills come back to the Commons. Then the third and final reading starts in which a bill is read with all amendments . MPs vote on them. If the bills pass, they are signed by the King or Queen and become acts of Parliament, part of the British law. However, if the Bills are not passed the both Houses, it can’t become an act of Parliament. A Bill is bounced back between 2 Chambers and this process is called a ping pong process. That means that the Bill couldn’t pass the both Houses without changes.
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Thank you.

Best regards,

Irender
Voting on legislation in the Houses of Parliament

The Speaker or the Lord Speaker is the person who officially controls the meetings and discussions. He is not allowed to give any advantages to any particular parties; he only announces the winning side. The Speaker can call all the members for a vote if his decision is challenged by the Lords or Commons. After the bell rings, members of the House of Commons have eight minutes to gather together in a chosen lobby.

In the House of Lords there is a Content Lobby and a Not-content Lobby, while the Commons is divided into Aye and No lobbies. All four lobbies lie on the sides of the main Chamber. In the Commons, MPs walk to either the Aye or No Lobby, according to their voting intention. After the members' names are recorded as they file past the Clerk, the list of how the MPs voted becomes public and also becomes part of the official parliamentary report.

The Content Lobby of the House of Lords

The process of lawmaking is roughly the same in both houses. However, if division occurs in the Content Lobby of the House of Lords, members will have their names recorded at temporary division desks. Each name is filled in alphabetically. The final result of the voting is announced in the Chamber.

A Bill is read out in the Chamber by the Clerk. This is the first stage of Bill introduction. Then comes a second reading, and the debate is opened. After the second reading, the Bill goes to the committee stage, where detailed examination of the Bill occurs. Then the Bill comes back to the Commons, and the third and final reading starts, in which the Bill is read with all its amendments. The MPs then vote on it. If the Bill passes, it is signed by the King or Queen and becomes an Act of Parliament, part of British law. However, if the Bill is not passed by both Houses, it cannot become an Act of Parliament. A Bill is bounced backand forth between the two Chambers, and this process is called the ping-pong process, meaning that the Bill could not pass both Houses without changes.
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I also have an introduction part. Maybe somebody will be so nice to check it. Thank you. Emotion: embarrassed

Introduction:

The Houses of Parliament:

The center of government is Parliament which makes all the important laws for the country in primary legislation. The British Parliament is made up of two Chambers: The House of Lords and the House of Commons. The leaders of the government seat on the front benches in the House of Commons and the other MPs seat behind them (called “back benches”). There is a similar arrangement in the House of Lords except that the Lords who refuse to be members of a party seat on special seats called “cross benches”. The difference between the two houses is that the Lords cannot present the bill to become a law. Each Chamber provides checks on the other. There is check and balance for both Houses.

The House of Commons: is the first Chamber in the UK Parliament and it is elected for a maximum of 5 years. The House of Commons is composed of 659 members called MPs (members of the Parliament). It has more power politically speaking than the House of Lords. The leader of the party who get the largest number of votes becomes a Prime Minister. MPs vote the laws. The president of this house is called the Speaker and he or she is elected by a majority of MPs.

House of Lords: has 1026 Lords and is made up of non-elected members called peers. The particularity of these Lords is that they are hereditary peers of England. That means they haven’t been elected but are members because they hold an inherited aristocratic title. They belong to the highest social class in the UK. The life peers relieve their titles from the King or Queen but they can’t pass it on to their children. Some Lords are called “low lords”. They form a special body specialized in the judicial duties. The main functions of the House of Lords are: to scrutinize and revise bills from the House of Commons, to initiate a new legislation, to debate current issues, to block or delay bills. It is also a final Court of Appeal.
I have underlined some problem areas similar to those in your first post. Please try to fix them and post a revised version:

The Houses of Parliament:

The center of government is Parliament which makes all the important laws for the country in primary legislation. The British Parliament is made up of two Chambers: The House of Lords and the House of Commons. The leaders of the government seat on the front benches in the House of Commons and the other MPs seat behind them (called “back benches”). There is a similar arrangement in the House of Lords except that the Lords who refuse to be members of a party seat on special seats called “cross benches”. The difference between the two houses is that the Lords cannot present the bill to become a law. Each Chamber provides checks on the other. There is check and balance for both Houses.

The House of Commons: is the first Chamber in the UK Parliament and it is elected for a maximum of 5 years. The House of Commons is composed of 659 members called MPs (members of the Parliament). It has more power politically speaking than the House of Lords. The leader of the party who get the largest number of votes becomes a Prime Minister. MPs vote the laws. The president of this house is called the Speaker and he or she is elected by a majority of MPs.

House of Lords: has 1026 Lords and is made up of non-elected members called peers. The particularity of these Lords is that they are hereditary peers of England. That means they haven’t been elected but are members because they hold an inherited aristocratic title (No. The Lords currently has around 830 Members, and there are three different types: life Peers, bishops and elected hereditary Peers). They belong to the highest social class in the UK. The life peers relieve their titles from the King or Queen but they can’t pass it on to their children. Some Lords are called “low lords”. They form a special body specialized in the judicial duties. The main functions of the House of Lords are: to scrutinize and revise bills from the House of Commons, to initiate a new legislation, to debate current issues, to block or delay bills. It is also a final Court of Appeal.
he Houses of Parliament

The center of government is Parliament that makes all the important laws for the country on primary legislation. The British Parliament is made up of two Chambers: The House of Lords and the House of Commons. The leaders of the governmentseats on the front benches in the House of Commons and the other MPs are seatting behind them (called “back benches”). There is a similar arrangement in the House of Lords except that the Lords who refuse to be members of a party seats on special seats called “cross benches”. The difference between the two houses is that the Lords cannot present the bill to become a law. Each Chamber provides checks on the other. There is Check and Balance for both Houses.
The House of Commons: is the first Chamber in the UK Parliament and it is elected for a maximum of 5 years. The House of Commons is composed of 659 members called MPs (members of Parliament). It has more power politically speaking than the House of Lords. The leader of the party who get the largest number of votes becomes the Prime Minister. MPs vote the laws. The president of this house is called the Speaker and he or she is elected by a majority of MPs.
The House of Lords: has 1026 Lords and is made up of non-elected members called peers. The particularity of these Lords is that they are hereditary peers of England. That means they haven’t been elected but are members because they hold an inherited aristocratic title (No. The Lords currently has around 830 Members, and there are three different types: life Peers, bishops and elected hereditary Peers). They belong to the highest social class in the UK. The life peers relieve their titles from the King or Queen but they can’t pass it on to their children. Some Lords are called “low lords”. They form a special body specialized in the judicial duties. The main functions of the House of Lords is: to scrutinize and revise bills from the House of Commons, to initiate new legislation, to debate current issues, to block or delay bills. It is also a final Court of Appeal.
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