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Most Interstates in North America have "rest areas" at regular intervals. Typically these include washrooms, a drinking fountain, and pay ... drinks, and newspapers; but nothing that requires a person to stay on the premises full-time and interact with the public.

The Florida rest stops on the interstates all have security guards stationed at them 24/7. There were a couple of rapes, some drug exchange shoot-outs, and some robberies before the guards were hired. The biggest problem, though, is that hookers cruise the lines of 18-wheelers. If the state can't tax the activity, they don't allow it.
The interstates in Florida are not toll roads. No one that lives here, though, refers to them as "freeways". The major toll road is the Florida Turnpike, and is referred to as the turnpike.

It's quite common to hear "the" in front interstate as in "Take the I-95 to the West Palm Beach exit.." That makes sense with "turnpike", but not with the highway number. But, it's common.

The major confusion to tourists on our interstates is that designation is based on the starting point and the ending point. I-4, for example, is even-numbered because it goes from the east coast to the west coast (or west to east if you prefer). Most of I-4 actually goes north and south or north-west/south-east. We have to tell tourists to "From Daytona, take I-4 westbound and go south to Lakeland."
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Here in Taiwan all the high-speed limmited-access highways are called "freeways" in Taiwan's quasi-offical second language, English ("high- speed roads" in Chinese). They are, in fact, all toll roads. It is possible, however, to enter, travel for up to 30 km (but only down south), and exit without having to pay a toll. When I drive to the "big city", I almost always use the "freeway", and for me, it's free.

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} There's a very brief summary of the chain's history at } . I frequently pass } an operating HoJo restaurant on U.S. 301 on the upper DelMarVa } peninsula in Maryland. It's been there at least 35 years that I can } remember. I can't recall ever stopping in.
Across 301 from the Dutch Country Family Deli and Truck Stop or something, just after you cross the river into Kent County? I guess I never noticed that they had a restaurant there.

R. J. Valentine
} The interstates in Florida are not toll roads. No one that lives } here, though, refers to them as "freeways". The major toll road is } the Florida Turnpike, and is referred to as the turnpike.

Down in southwest Florida, where I spend most of my Florida time, the main roads, one of them is an "Alley" and another is a "Trail".

R. J. Valentine
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The service areas on I-95 in Delaware and Maryland are in the areas between the carriageways(1), so that you have ... I only did that once, and it was terrifying.. (1) That's the UK term; I don't know the US equivalent.

There isn't one. We get by with "lanes" with a suitable modifier (as in "between the northbound and southbound lanes"), or else with "roadway"; but neither of these unambiguously conveys the meaning unless you already know how many of them the road has.

Mark Brader, Toronto "More importantly, Mark is just plain wrong." (Email Removed) John Hollingsworth
The major confusion to tourists on our interstates is that designation is based on the starting point and the ending point. I-4, for example, is even-numbered because it goes from the east coast to the west coast (or west to east if you prefer).

To me that sounds as if it went to California or something. Actually it just goes from one side of the Florida peninsula to the other east coast to Gulf coast. Isn't "Gulf coast" normal usage in Florida?
Most of I-4 actually goes north and south or north-west/south-east.

On the map I'm looking at, the whole road is pretty much northwest- southeast. However, the western half is closer to E-W than N-S, while the eastern (or northern) half is closer to N-S than E-W. Given the usual convention that only the four cardinal directions are used to name directions, there wasn't any good solution.

Mark Brader At any rate, C++ != C. Actually, the value of Toronto the expression "C++ != C" is (undefined). (Email Removed) Peter da Silva

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Maria Conlon: Evan Kirshenbaum:

They appear to only be in the hotel business these days ...

Well, there was a Howard Johnson's restaurant on Times Square when I was there about a year ago. I don't ... surprise either way, as most Howard Johnson's hotels that I've seen in recent years no longer have Howard Johnson's restaurants.

I have the impression that Howard Johnson's is not as big a company as it once was. Fewer restaurants, fewer hotels/motels at least around the Detroit area. In the 1950s and 1960s, I ate at Howard Johnson's fairly often (though I never got into calling them "HoJo's"). In the 1970s, I saw them on the Ohio Turnpike. Since those days, I can't recall seeing very many at all restaurants or "lodging."

But things are always changing. Doughnut shops seem to be disappearing, too. Is that a slot that Starbucks is filling? Do they serve doughnuts? Puffed-up supersized flavored bagels (yuck)? And is their coffee pardon me, "espresso" really worth the price?
I'm getting to be an old stick-in-the-mud. This world is getting just too slick and yuppified. (I imagine "yuppie" is no longer an in-word, but I don't know what replaced it.)
Maria Conlon
"In-word" is probably out, as well.
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I'm developing a sense that I'm laboriously ascending a molehill ... mark unless "aspirin", mentioned earlier, is such an example.

It is in the US, but not in other parts of the world. (Canada, at least.) Some others, from http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Genericized ... "gramophone", "granola", "heroin", "jungle gym", "LP", "linoleum", "merry widow", "mimeograph", "photostat", "pianola", "pogo stick", "spandex", "tarmac", "yo-yo", "zeppelin", and "zipper".

Enjoyable list. Tough that Baron von Zeppelin lost his trademark, though! I'll spare him a charitable thought next time I buy an airship. In UK Tarmac is still the name of the company, btw. It's only by the merest chance that I happen to know what a "merry widow" is in the US; and I'm glad they lost the right to use the name "cola" as private property, as it smacks of Western companies' attempts to patent neem trees.
"Elastoplast" is still a registered trademark in the US, owned by Beiersdorf Aktiengesellschaft Corporation. The cited page lists words that ... product of any particular company, and, indeed, for some of them I'm surprised to learn that they ever were trademarks.

Right-pond usage differs very slightly on these (or at any rate on those which are known over here): I'd say several of them are seen as trademarks while at the same time being used generically, like "Thermos". And, yes, it's surprising to learn that "ping-pong" and "bubble wrap" are trademarks; with "playbill", it's astounding.

"VHS" is perhaps a special case, if I'm right in assuming it's a technology licensed to manufactureres, like the Compact Disc system; in any case, the expression's not much used conversationally over here, where the usual over-the-counter distinction is "video or DVD?", and few outside the business even know about U-Matic or whatever.

Mike.
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