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It's quite common to hear "the" in front interstate as in "Take the I-95 to the West Palm Beach exit.." That makes sense with "turnpike", but not with the highway number. But, it's common.

This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it? In Br, roads referred to by their class-letter and number are always "the", just as (AFAIK) anything else with "road" in its name is always "the": "the M1", "the B3227", "the Oxford Road", "the Chiswick High Road".

Streets, OTOH, seem to be given "the" only when their name is "High" (I can't really believe it's that simple: exceptions will presumably appear); but there are some plain "High Streets"; Oxford, uniquely, has spoken forms "the High", "the Broad", and IIRC "the Corn" abbreviated from "Cornmarket" (is this one obsolete?). When a road happens to be called a "street" indicating Roman origin there is no "the": "Watling Street", "Ermine Street".
I think "Ways" are variable, but tend to have "the".

Mike.
Say, isn't that redundant?

Yup, but that's what it said.

Presumably a Germanophone company which set up a subsidiary in the US and wanted to keep its name, but be partially comprehensible? I use Lloyds TSB Bank, which in derivation expands to "Lloyds Trustee Savings Bank Bank" (contrast HSBC, which doggedly refuses to say its name means "Hong-Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation" or anything else).
Mike.
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It's quite common to hear "the" in front interstate as ... "turnpike", but not with the highway number. But, it's common.

This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it? In Br, roads referred to by their class-letter and number are ... Oxford, uniquely, has spoken forms "the High", "the Broad", and IIRC "the Corn" abbreviated from "Cornmarket" (is this one obsolete?).

In about 38 years in total as an Oxford resident I have never heard anyone talk about "the Corn": it is always "Cornmarket" (currently infamous for the saga of its costly paving and street furniture). "The Broad" was occasionally heard years ago among the "gown" element but these days it would be unusual: most people would probably think it a reference to an unnamed woman. "The High" is still current, although bus passengers tend to ask simply for "Town" these days (John may know otherwise: he travels thence on a different bus route, I suspect).

Haven't we discussed this before?

Laura
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The major confusion to tourists on our interstates is that ... the west coast (or west to east if you prefer).

To me that sounds as if it went to California or something.

I-4 is "our" interstate and is really an "intra". I-95 is truly inter.
Actually it just goes from one side of the Florida peninsula to the other east coast to Gulf coast. Isn't "Gulf coast" normal usage in Florida?

If you need to specify, yes. Either "east coast" or "Atlantic coast", or "west coast" or "Gulf coast", works, but "east" and "Gulf" are probably most commonly used.
It's quite common to hear "the" in front interstate as ... "turnpike", but not with the highway number. But, it's common.

This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it?

Seems to be regional. In the Northeast, and I believe most places in the US, interstates don't get a preceding "the". Southern California apparently uses "the", but, I'm told, Northern California doesn't.
In Br, roads referred to by their class-letter and number are always "the", just as (AFAIK) anything else with "road" in its name is always "the": "the M1", "the B3227", "the Oxford Road", "the Chiswick High Road".

This was also done back in the 19th century in the US, but the practice disappeared. (More precisely, and this is my understanding of the BrE usage, 'the' is used where "the X Road" means 'the road to X'. In the US today it's pretty common to have streets or roads that have 'road' in their name but are not especially the road to anything of significance; 'road' is sometimes used to suggest rusticity.)
Streets, OTOH, seem to be given "the" only when their name is "High" (I can't really believe it's that simple: ... origin there is no "the": "Watling Street", "Ermine Street". I think "Ways" are variable, but tend to have "the".

In general, none of the corresponding sorts of streets get "the" in the US. One exception to all this that I know of is the old Boston Post Road in Connecticut, aka (essentially) U.S. Route 1. This seems to be officially called "POST ROAD" in much of coastal Connecticut, and the local people routinely say "the Post Road". There may be other exceptional cases like this in other regions, but I believe they are exceptional.
Named (i.e., where the name is more than just a number) limited-access highways *do* typically if not always get "the". Thus, a named "turnpike" that is limited or controlled-access gets 'the', while a named "turnpike" that is just an ordinary street or road does not get 'the'.

At least, this is what I've observed.
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I have the impression that Howard Johnson's is not as big a company as it once was. Fewer restaurants, fewer ... them on the Ohio Turnpike. Since those days, I can't recall seeing very many at all restaurants or "lodging."

There's an interesting biased history of HoJo at
http://www.hojo.com/HowardJohnson/control/brand history which seems to pernt to there being lots of chaos and turmoil during the 1980s.
But things are always changing. Doughnut shops seem to be disappearing, too. Is that a slot that Starbucks is filling? Do they serve doughnuts?

Not that I've noticed. I think the doughnut (thank you for spelling it correctly) shop market has been being (so to say) captured by the likes of Dunkin Donuts and that Southern upstart 'Krispy Kreme' for a long time now (NTTAWWT). Whether that's a good development is unclear. I fail to see what's so great about Krispy Kreme, but that sort of doughnut product seems to be quite popular in Chicago and other places (and I'm sure it is or will be big in the UK, what with the infamous British sweet toof).
Puffed-up supersized flavored bagels (yuck)?

Those are mainly found in those awful suburban "bagel" chains.
And is their coffee pardon me, "espresso" really worth the price?

I think the Starbuck's class of coffee places, which also includes their competitors, does serve a much better caffeinated beverage than the other sorts of places from which coffee can be obtained. Whether it's worth the price is another story. It's probably best to make espresso at home, but I think part of the reason for the popularity of places like Starbuck's is that they are a sort of coffee functional alternative to the traditional alcoholic-(beverage)-serving bar or HBrE 'pub'.
Named (i.e., where the name is more than just a number) limited-access highways *do* typically if not always get "the". ... "turnpike" that is just an ordinary street or road does not get 'the'. At least, this is what I've observed.

"Named" does not always mean anything. The Florida State Turnpike used be "named" the Sunshine State Parkway. No one called it that. It was just "The Turnpike". In 1966, they gave up the ghost.

On the other hand, I-75 is "Alligator Alley" to all and sundry. The Beeline Expressway is now becoming the 528 and the signs for "Beeline" are disappearing. Current rental agency car maps don't even show "Beeline".
State Road 192 used to be called "SR 192", but there were signs around designating it "The Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway". The Bronson family finally got the state the officially name the road "Irlo Bronson Highway" and stores now have addresses like 4367 Irlo Bronson Highway.
There's a place in Tampa where I-275 and I-4 connect that is informally called "malfunction junction". That's name enough for everyone familiar with the area.
Most irritating street name in London: Avenue Road. Coming soon; Road Avenue.
DC
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Well, there was a Howard Johnson's restaurant on Times Square when I was there about a year ago.

Are things on Times Square? I thought things were in Times Square. Anyone? Richard?
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
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