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It's quite common to hear "the" in front interstate as ... "turnpike", but not with the highway number. But, it's common.

This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it? In Br, roads referred to by their class-letter and number are ... else with "road" in its name is always "the": "the M1", "the B3227", "the Oxford Road", "the Chiswick High Road".

I'm not convinced of that any more. Around here, people are directed down Bacup Road, along Rochdale Road and up Halifax Road. I don't recall anyone talking about "the" Rochdale Road.

Hooray for the differently sane.
This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it? ... M1", "the B3227", "the Oxford Road", "the Chiswick High Road".

I'm not convinced of that any more. Around here, people are directed down Bacup Road, along Rochdale Road and up Halifax Road. I don't recall anyone talking about "the" Rochdale Road.[/nq]If anyone told me to take 'the Oxford Road', I'd be looking for a signpost pointing to Oxford, and the road might or might not be called 'Oxford Road'. 'Chiswick High Road' is the full name of an actual road: it is not a 'High Road' that happens to run through Chiswick. 'The North Circular Road' and the 'the South Circular Road' form an inner ring road around London, nearer to the city than 'the M25'. Each consists of suburban highways, some parts almost to motorway standard, others just normal two-way highways.

Each part has an actual street name which was probably its local name before the circular system - mainly a set of signposts with some road improvement in places - was developed. Most main Axxx and Bxxx roads are a series of individually-named roads, sometimes with major improvements, linked together with signposts. I think the motorways were all built through previously undeveloped countryside, so have no individual names for their pieces, but I may be wrong.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
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This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it? In ... M1", "the B3227", "the Oxford Road", "the Chiswick High Road".

I'm not convinced of that any more. Around here, people are directed down Bacup Road, along Rochdale Road and up Halifax Road. I don't recall anyone talking about "the" Rochdale Road.

All grist to the mill: thanks.
Mike.
This is one of those idiosyncratic things, isn't it? ... M1", "the B3227", "the Oxford Road", "the Chiswick High Road".

I'm not convinced of that any more. Around here, people are directed down Bacup Road, along Rochdale Road and up Halifax Road. I don't recall anyone talking about "the" Rochdale Road.

BrE:
"The Oxford road" = the road which leads to Oxford "Oxford Road" = the road labelled thus.
But don't assume the same applies to Streets, Lanes, etc.

Matti
Why would you assume that? As I recall, the north-south ... north-south, though as I recall it zigzags here and there.

Not unlike Manhattan's Broadway (Chicago's Broadway looks a whole lot more like Astoria's Broadway), yet of course Manhattan's Broadway is ... of Manhattan, you'd think that they'd've realized that Manhattan's Broadway was not "Broadway Street" (or "Broadway Avenue" or Broadway anything).

It's never called "Broadway Street" in conversation, unlike State Street or Halsted Street, so that designation must be a formality observed only by mapmakers.
Meanwhile, I've thought of numerous exceptions to
the Street/Avenue convention.
In the west of the city are numerous "Avenues" that run North/South: Western, Damen, California, Kedzie, etc.

Division Street runs east-west, as do Madison, Addison, and Howard.
Which either proves the rule or just goes to show that Chicagoans are ungovernable.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
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London? Why not Toronto? Let us also remember Street Road, in Philadelphia.

Some maps show Chicago's Broadway... as "Broadway Street", but I'd have to assume that's an error.

North Toronto also has a "Broadway Avenue". It's a side street, while Avenue Road is a main road.

Mark Brader, Toronto > "Most people are other people. Their thoughts (Email Removed) > are someone else's opinions..." Oscar Wilde
}>>> Most irritating street name in London: Avenue Road. }
}>> London? Why not Toronto?
}>>
}>> Let us also remember Street Road, in Philadelphia. }
}> Some maps show Chicago's Broadway... as "Broadway Street", but I'd have to }> assume that's an error.
}
} North Toronto also has a "Broadway Avenue". It's a side street, while } Avenue Road is a main road.Well, heck, Fulton, Upstate, has a Broadway Street that goes over the Broadway Bridge across the mighty Oswego River (one of the few rivers in America that flows north, as it does from its source at Three Rivers until it flows into the Lake). Broadway is the dividing line in historic Fulton between the north numbers and the south numbers. Over in historic Oswego Falls (now part of Fulton) they're all west numbers.

As I recall, Immaculate Conception Church (referring to an event asserted with great confidence to have happened before the birth of the mother of the Jesus of Christian fame), where my now-retired baby brother was baptized (not to be confused with the church in St. Albans where Al Roker (not to be confused with Al Al Cool J) and I were baptized) is right there on the south side of Broadway Street.
It reminds me, though, that every once in a while on Joan of Arcadia , which makes free use of obviously Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration location shots, they talk about something happening "upstate". Now if you check a map of Maryland, something over half of the counties border on Mason-and-Dixon's Line (which is to say, on Pennsylvania or Delaware), and at least half of the remaining counties border on one of those counties. It's possible that some people in what's left (southeast of DC) call something "upstate", but I've never heard it. As a matter of English usage, there is not "upstate" in Maryland.

R. J. Valentine
Hi, Rey!
Just catching up...
On Wed, 9 Jun 2004, in alt.usage.english, Dr Robin Bignall (Email Removed) writes
I was in a pub run by a Jugoslavian yesterday.

I would say "Jugoslav", but in English I would spell it "Yugoslav".
Mark Browne
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