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I agree that they didn't define their terms well at all, but I took the distinction to mean one between ... fake smile is the 12th face, the young Asian-looking woman whose non-smiling face was in a kind of constant pre-smile.

That was one of my lucky guesses. I almost felt guilty when, reluctantly I marked "fake", thinking that it might be a cultural difference.

Speaking of cultural differences, only in America I discovered the comforting smile, an expression of warmth which by all means I wouldn't qualify as "fake".

I ran into my ex-neighbor. "How is your father?" Her face broke into a peaceful, serene grin, accompanied by a nod: "He passed away last week". That kind of smile used to puzzle me, until I realized it was a comfort smile when breaking bad news, to alleviate the shock.
You'd be viewed as an odd person indeed if you never produced a fake smile. Invariably, when we are introduced to someone we bring up a smile. That smile does not express any joy at the meeting in most cases.
I am often accused of being grumpy or mad because I don't work up that fake smile when I do something like place an order in a fast-food restaurant. Where's the joy in ordering a cheeseburger, mustard only, and a drink? Without that grimace of ersatz joy, the stranger we meet casually in daily contact wonders "What's your problem?".

The produced smile doesn't mean joy; it simply says "I'm open to having this encounter being on a friendly basis." The joyful smile is the spontaneous reaction to something pleasing.

The faked smile can be a real smile in the sense that the facial expression is a contrived action to set the stage that friendliness is offered. It's a real indication of intent even if it's not a real indication of joy.
Funny, but I just left the keyboard to talk to my wife about something, and produced a fake smile in that conversation. Thinking about this topic, I was aware of the fakeness.
My wife has an irritating habit of asking questions when she should know that I don't have answers. A relative of hers who is visiting in this area called. I answered the phone, and the conversation was little more than telling him that I'd have my wife call him back when she got out of the shower.
Naturally, my wife asked me how long he'd be in town, where was he staying, was he free to meet us somewhere today, and on and on. At each question, I repeated that I had just said that I'd have her call him. By the third question, I had this fake smile pasted over my face to indicate that I wasn't being abrupt with her, but that I simply didn't know the answers. Without that, she gets testy.

The point of this very dull personal anecdote is that fake is not necessarily bad. It is a real attempt to keep things friendly.

Is the ultimate fake smile the Emotion: smile ?
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I got in late from the theater, and a couple of drinks, and didn't nitcie until I had clicked through about half of the faces

"Nitcie". v. tr. & intr. it's when you spot something you're going to pick a nit upon.
Matti
I did rather poorly 12 right out of 20. ... revealing as I thought that or I misread them.

I did even worse: I got in late from the theater, and a couple of drinks, and didn't nitcie until ... first. So I gave up and went to bed. So, how did they know that the genuine smiles weren't fake?

Or that the fake smiles weren't genuine? Very dubious science, in my view.

I was sober and wide awake when I did it: what does getting them all right say about me?

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Here's a fun test. The BBC has a "Spot the fake smile" test. 20 pictures of people smiling. How many can you spot? My score: 18/20 http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/mind/surveys/smiles /

I got 14/20, and I was surprised I did any better than chance. I had very little confidence in my answers.

Mike Nitabach
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
CyberCypher wrote, in part:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/mind/surveys/smiles /

Am I the only one who didn't know what to answer for "level of formal schooling"?

No.
(I assume "Degree level", but..)

Not knowing what any of them meant, I just picked the one in the middle. How far off could I be?
Maria Conlon
Attended college (actually, a university), but did not finish.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/mind/surveys/smiles /

Am I the only one who didn't know what to answer for "level of formal schooling"? (I assume "Degree level", but..)

I last had to wear a uniform in 9th grade.

SML
http://pirate-women.com
david56 filted:
CyberCypher typed thus:

Here's a fun test. The BBC has a "Spot the ... smiling. How many can you spot? My score: 18/20 http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/mind/surveys/smiles /

17/20 for me, perhaps surprisingly.

11/20...missed five of the fake ones and four of the genuine ones...also didn't seem to make much difference whether the smiler was a man or a woman, or whether I thought the answer was obvious or more subtle..

In short, my results are not statistically different from choosing at random, which squares with my experience in daily life..r
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I am often accused of being grumpy or mad because I don't work up that fake smile when I do ... very dull personal anecdote is that fake is not necessarily bad. It is a real attempt to keep things friendly.

Yes, but what a relief to read the previous quoted para from the keyboard of an American: one of the differences between Americans and the rest of us is that we don't feel obliged to deploy the facial rictus all the time, and it can become rather oppressive to be on the receiving end. In fact, it can sometimes feel threatening: what the hell is this person smiling at me for ?
Is the ultimate fake smile the Emotion: smile ?

Yes.
Mike.
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