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Here's a fun test. The BBC has a "Spot the fake smile" test. 20 pictures of people smiling. How many can you spot? My score: 18/20

That was enjoyable. My score: 14/20.
Here's a question for all the thespians:
Is an actor's smile considered fake?
-Dave
Here's a fun test. The BBC has a "Spot the ... people smiling. How many can you spot? My score: 18/20

That was enjoyable. My score: 14/20. Here's a question for all the thespians: Is an actor's smile considered fake?

Only when he's faking it, or "acting".
I'm sure even actors smile genuine
smiles sometimes. Winning a lawsuit
probably occasions at least a grin.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
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I was sober and wide awake when I did it: what does getting them all right say about me?

If I recall correctly, Laura, you also had the highest score on the "Can you tell your ass from your elbow" test. What does that say about you?!

Hm. Probably that I should keep my results to myself.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Daave wrote on 06 Jun 2004:
Here's a fun test. The BBC has a "Spot the ... people smiling. How many can you spot? My score: 18/20

That was enjoyable. My score: 14/20. Here's a question for all the thespians: Is an actor's smile considered fake?

Not if the actor is one of those people who gets into character and lives the part. Such actors really feel the emotions they are scripted to express. More to the point, though, what about a con-man? Do they really feel what they project because they're such good actors?

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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Laura F Spira wrote on 06 Jun 2004:
If I recall correctly, Laura, you also had the highest ... from your elbow" test. What does that say about you?!

Hm. Probably that I should keep my results to myself.

Nobody likes Little Miss Perfect, Laura. You just made us all realize what limited creatures we all are. Hmmpf!

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
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Laura F Spira wrote on 06 Jun 2004:

Hm. Probably that I should keep my results to myself.

Nobody likes Little Miss Perfect, Laura. You just made us all realize what limited creatures we all are. Hmmpf!

Surely you realise that it's those of us who are most seriously flawed who seek consolation in coming top in quizzes? And bragging about it.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Laura F Spira wrote on 06 Jun 2004:
Laura F Spira wrote on 06 Jun 2004: Nobody likes ... us all realize what limited creatures we all are. Hmmpf!

Surely you realise that it's those of us who are most seriously flawed who seek consolation in coming top in quizzes? And bragging about it.

Cold comfort, my dear, when you highlight all our obvious flaws while yours are all internal. You realize, of course, that you will have to fail to achieve perfection on the next 10 such quizzes in order to redeem yourself.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
david56 filted: 11/20

Thank goodness someone scored more poorly than I did: 13/20.

Snap. Isn't poorness at this kind of thing a symptom of autism, or am I confused again?
Matti
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You're most welcome Tony. I'm sure you'll soon get to love the charming bloody-mindedness of folk who work in our service industries.

If you get around to it, that's a phrase that I like to see discussed. I think of "bloody-minded" as being stubborn, but I'm not sure if this is the only, or the correct, definition.

Years ago, after being out of the country for about six months, I arrived back at Dover in the car late at night. We pulled into a services a few miles up the road and I went into the Little Chef caff to make a phone call. Before I could put the money in, the manageress came over and told me they were closing into two minutes. "That's alright", I said, "I'm just phoning home, I'll be 30 seconds". But she wouldn't let me use the phone. It didn't matter, she said, there was another phone in the garage/filling station.
It's gone midnight, we've driven from Munich in a day, I am completely knackered and I just want to phone home before my folks go to bed.

So I went into the garage. No, they didn't have a public phone. They never had had one.
Back outside the manageress is grinning and waving the keys at me through the glass door of the cafe. Welcome to the UK.
That's one definition of British bloody-mindedness. It's not always seen as a bad quality though, as yesterday's celebrations reminded us.

DC
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