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"It isn't quite sure that he will be present at the meeting."

"It isn't quite certain that he will be present at the meeting."

Are there any differences between the two sentences above? Thanks for help.
Comments  
no, they are the same
Hi,

"It isn't quite sure that he will be present at the meeting."

"It isn't quite certain that he will be present at the meeting."

Are there any differences between the two sentences above? Thanks for help.

The words 'sure' and 'certain' are most commonly used for people (He is sure ...). In the above examples, I'd prefer a word like 'definite'. Or else, I'd prefer to indicate 'who' is sure/certain.

These words are very similar. However, a comment on subtleties -

certain = I'm confident that it is true

sure = suggests I have a good reason to think it's true

Best wishes, Clive
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Personally, I would use certain, not sure.
It isn't quite certain that ...

I tend to use sure to describe people.
I am sure that ...
She was sure that ...
John is sure that ...


I don't usually use sure with preposed it.
?It is sure that ...

To my ear, that makes it sound like some animate entity is sure about something, which is not the meaning, of course.

However, the following (with sure thing) sounds just fine, though informal:

It's not a sure thing that he'll win.


CJ
Thank you for your help.

Your explanation is helpful to me.

Thanks.
Clive"It isn't quite sure that he will be present at the meeting."

The words 'sure' and 'certain' are most commonly used for people (He is sure ...). In the above examples, I'd prefer a word like 'definite'. Or else, I'd prefer to indicate 'who' is sure/certain.
Then the sentence is wrong, isn't it?
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Hi,

I wouldn't say it's absolutely wrong. I said I myself would prefer to say it differently.

'Sure' can be used in the sene of 'definite' or 'reliable', eg

- Bet on that horse, it'll win the race.It's a sure thing.

- He had a sure grip on the ladder.

But I'd say it's more commonly used for people.

Best wishes, Clive
Yeah, just like CJ said, "It isn't quite sure..." is a poor sentence. When I hear something like that, I would think, who is this 'it'?

For "It isn't quite certain...", I would understand the 'it' to mean the situation.

It's like that because certain and sure are very different although they feel similar. You can take surely and certainly as examples.

A: He's going to win, surely?
B: It's not a sure thing. Nothing is ever certain.
A: But I'm sure he will win.
B: You can never be too sure. It's not certain that he can win.
*A thinks for a while.*
A: Wait, I've got an idea. Can you help me out?
B: Why, certainly! What did you have in mind?

That's generally how a conversation with sures and certains will go. (Although it sounds really dumb, haha)