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Sure Pride itself has dictated to the fellows of our colleges the absurd passion of being attended at meals, and on other public occasions, by those poor men, who, willing to be scholars, come in upon some charitable foundation. It implies a contradiction, for men to be at once learning the liberal arts, and at the some time treated as slaves; at once studying freedom, and practicing servitude. 

QUESTION:

1. What is 'Sure Pride'?

2. Who are 'the fellows of our colleges'? Do we need more context to tell whom they are?

3.passion = thought?

4.attended = accompanied OR served ?
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My try:

QUESTION:

1. What is 'Sure Pride'? --- Idon't know either.Emotion: smile

2. Who are 'the fellows of our colleges'? Do we need more context to tell whom they are? We need extra information to learn who they are. For the time being, we just know that they are attended by those por men, who, willing to be scholars.

3.passion = thought? --- the strong want of doing something.

4.attended = accompanied OR served ? Yeah, it mess accompanied by servants or people or whatever.
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Hi,

Sure Pride itself has dictated to the fellows of our colleges the absurd passion of being attended at meals, and on other public occasions, by those poor men, who, willing to be scholars, come in upon some charitable foundation. It implies a contradiction, for men to be at once learning the liberal arts, and at the some time treated as slaves; at once studying freedom, and practicing servitude. This passage seems to be written in quite an archaic style. Where did you find it?

QUESTION:

1. What is 'Sure Pride'? Is it written with a capital 'P' in the original? 'Pride' is pride in the sense of conceit. I'm not sure about the 'sure' here, other than an intensifier.

2. Who are 'the fellows of our colleges'? Do we need more context to tell whom they are? Generally speaking, the phrase refers to senior teaching /research members of a college.

3.passion = thought? desire, urge.

4.attended = accompanied OR served ? More 'served', eg at table.

Best wishes, Clive
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Comments  
These words were written in the 18th century commenting on students of the Oxford University.

Sure Pride, that's how it's printed in the original.

Did the teachers have the power to order students to serve them at meals and other public occasions in Oxford back in the 18th century?
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Hi,

These words were written in the 18th century commenting on students of the Oxford University.

Sure Pride, that's how it's printed in the original. At that time, people were more free in their use of capital letters, less constrained by rules.

Did the teachers have the power to order students to serve them at meals and other public occasions in Oxford back in the 18th century? Broadly speaking, it was a way in which poor students could pay for their education.

CLive