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Many moons ago, when I travelled to and from Europe ... salt helped a lot made it edible, in fact.

It may be worth noting that there are two basic types of butter lactic (aka cultured) and sweet-cream. Most ... a culture added to them, and are often unsalted. I assume Left- and Under-pondian butter is largely the sweet-cream type.

The butter we get here in Minnesota is labeled "sweet-cream"; I don't know how it's actually made, never having studied dairy tech. I don't find American unsalted butter any more appealing than French.
David Dyer-Bennet, , RKBA: Pics: Dragaera/Steven Brust:
The butter we get here in Minnesota is labeled "sweet-cream"

Say, do youse get anything besides "Land O Lakes"?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Clearly, THC is a "narcotic" in the sense that in many countries, it is subject to legal restrictions similar to those put upon opiates.

To my way of thinking, the only sensible way of classifying a drug is by the effect it has on ... cop gets the most highly motivated when you have some in your pocket makes no sense at all to me.

Weed made me sleepy, but that could be just me, I guess. My brother had a different reaction talk, talk, talk ...

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Many moons ago, when I travelled to and from Europe ... salt helped a lot made it edible, in fact.

Few things are nicer than unsalted butter spread on freshly baked bread, preferably of the French variety. I learned this ... of salt on it, in it, or both. Charles Riggs, who keeps both unsalted and salted butter on hand

The butter from Latvia that was made for export was quite salty. It was available also locally, but you had to specifically ask for it, and it cost more. That is what my mom bought. Always.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Of course. If hallucinogens had been made illegal before narcotics, we might very well be referring to all illicit drugs as "hallucinogens" now. (I wonder: What would "narcs" be called?)
the two possible meanings in which a word like "intergalactic" ... scientists and the other of which is used quite differently).

Curious. "Intergalactic" means "between two galaxies" or "among galaxies". What other possible meaning is there?

"Pertaining to outer space" or "pertaining to the space between solar systems." Such a meaning is given or implied in MWCD11, the Random House Webster's Unabridged,* and (as "intergalactique") in the French dictionary the *Grand Robert* (the closest thing the French have to the Oxford English Dictionary). I have proposed that getting rid of this meaning would be a good reform, as I expect that this use of the word "intergalactic" can help to confuse some people about the nature of the universe. Nevertheless, the meanings which the word now actually has include *both "pertaining to the space between galaxies" and "pertaining to the space between solar systems."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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The butter we get here in Minnesota is labeled "sweet-cream"

Say, do youse get anything besides "Land O Lakes"?

Crystal Farms butter and the house brand of Cub Foods come to mind. And, as I pointed out before, butter from Normandy and Denmark are available.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Neither is any other part of the plant. (Mind you, ... just quibbling about nomenclature, which seems on-topic for this group.)

I thought about that, but that's what the site said, and I didn't instantly come up with a better word ... parts of them? From the article, I understood that even seeds from our Mendocino crop could yield harmless cannabis butter.

Well, even the butter made with the resinous buds is "harmless", but to avoid the THC you'd need to be careful to strip the seeds of their herbaceous coat. The seeds themselves do not have the active ingredient but they are each individually ensconced in tissue that's loaded with it.
The butter we get here in Minnesota is labeled "sweet-cream"

Say, do youse get anything besides "Land O Lakes"?

Sure, lots of brands; even short of looking at Lunds or Byerly's for premium products.

David Dyer-Bennet, , RKBA: Pics: Dragaera/Steven Brust:
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No, quibbling about putting cannabis in the same category with the coca and poppy derivatives.

What's wrong with poppy derivatives? I use ground white poppyseed as a thickening in curries and I know it is used in the Balkans in cakes. For a while, it was illegal in Australia because they thought opium/heroin could be made from it. It's nothing like those blueish poppy seeds they use on bread, but neither sort are drugs.

Rob Bannister
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