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Of course cannabis smokers, a great many of them, are concerned about legal consequences.

Of course. But do they tend to actually classify the drug on that basis? Unless I misunderstood the question, it had to do with classifying drugs, and it is that to which I was responding.

In the cases I know anything about it's a complex decision. Maybe the people I've ever discussed the issue with just don't like* cocaine much, and the fact that it's more persecuted that marijuana isn't really part of their decision process. I know that's true in *some cases, but I'm not at all sure it's true in all cases. Several people have said things that suggest they'd like to do cocaine regularly, if they thought it was safer and if it was more affordable.
David Dyer-Bennet, , RKBA: Pics: Dragaera/Steven Brust:
Don't the poppy seeds found on poppy seed rolls show up on drug tests as a false-positive? Or is this an urban myth?

The Mythbuster guys checked that one out, and indeed got positives from consuming baked goods with poppy seeds.

See
http://www.mythbustersfanclub.com/html/poppy.html

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The body was wrapped in duct tape,
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >weighted down with concrete blocksPalo Alto, CA 94304 >and a telephone cord was tied

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
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Don't the poppy seeds found on poppy seed rolls show up on drug tests as a false-positive? Or is this an urban myth?

It seems that they could cause a positive reading on a drug test. http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a5 116.html Good thing they didn't have ... fields there. Good grief! I've eated poppy seeds by the handful and cannabis-butter by the pound! Was I a doper?

I do remember, as kid in England, the old folk would tell us that sniffing the poppies that grew wild in the cornfields would make us sleepy and that we shouldn't do it. Stimulated by this prohibition, I, of course, sniffed a lot of poppies, but never once felt sleepy.

Rob Bannister
>
I do remember, as kid in England, the old folk would tell us that sniffing the poppies that grew wild ... Stimulated by this prohibition, I, of course, sniffed a lot of poppies, but never once felt sleepy. Rob Bannister

It worked okay for dorothy.
Illegal drug classification no longer has any bearing on the drugs themselves but on the penalties that can be levied. Grass is classified as a narcotic so they can put you in jail for it.

In Canada simple possession of any illegal drug can result in jail time, but the same distinction is made: cannabis, with the 'real' narcotics and cocaine, is covered by the Narcotics Control Act , under which I believe the Crown may always proceed by indictment, while others appear in the Food and Drug Act , under which a summary conviction carries a maximum penalty of two years.

Odysseus
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Here (St. Louis), both unsalted and salted sweet cream butter are sold in the four-sticks-to-a-pound boxes. Unsalted is the usual butter called for in baking recipes.

I've been told that salt can hide the "off" flavor of inferior-quality milk when used to make butter. I will buy unsalted butter and salt it, if it needs salt, myself. (I've not found it needs it.)

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
As far as I know, users do not classify drugs by market demand or by legal consequences.

They certainly are aware of the price structure and availability. Market demand is a key component of that. As for ... drugs are fairly careful about it; that seems to suggest they're aware of possible consequences, and trying to avoid them.

Yes, that's true... and I don't know that that has anything to do with how they tend to classify them.
Users don't care about the market demand, but about how ... it never occurs to them that they might get caught.

That's simply false.

Which?
Incidentally, it occurs to me that my experience of "drug users" is atypical. I've spent the past sixteen years working in and around ambulances and hospitals and psychiatric units and such. I don't see most people who are using; I only see the ones who abuse. Perhaps I should remind myself of this on occasion.

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
Robert Bannister typed thus:
I do remember, as kid in England, the old folk would tell us that sniffing the poppies that grew wild ... shouldn't do it. Stimulated by this prohibition, I, of course, sniffed a lot of poppies, but never once felt sleepy.

I never sniffed any poppies, and I felt sleepy nearly every day.

David
==
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Illegal drug classification no longer has any bearing on the ... narcotic so they can put you in jail for it.

In Canada simple possession of any illegal drug can result in jail time, but the same distinction is made: cannabis, ... in the Food and Drug Act , under which a summary conviction carries a maximum penalty of two years.

In the UK, the term "narcotics" has never been used in legislation, but that doesn't stop either the police or the press from using it. What they mean by it is usually not at all obvious. It used to be commonly used in medicine as a synonym for "opiates" - I have a 1970s pharmacopoeia which includes the heading "Morphine and other Narcotic Analgesics", but doesn't seem to be much used now.

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
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