In a previous post to alt.english.usage , I wrote the following, in response to a poster who was writing from Poland:
(begin quote from Usenet post)Just as you can find "Swiss cheese" in a supermarket in the US without any of it having been imported from Switzerland, you can find "Polish sausage" in such a supermarket without any of it having been imported from Poland. For us, "Polish sausage" is a type of sausage, like "Italian sausage," or "bratwurst," or "knockwurst." Perhaps Don of Kansas City, Missouri, who makes sausages as a hobby, could identify the difference between these Polish sausage and other types of sausages.

I could tell you only that the meat in Polish sausage is course ground and they are paler. In length, Polish sausages are straight and are suitable to serve bun, while something like kielbasa comes in a long form (typically sold in the shape of a U) which is curved. On those relatively rare occasions when I buy Polish sausage, it is a national brand: Johnsonville brand Polish sausages.

(end quote from Usenet post)
The poster was amused (his post included the word "hehehe") by this distinction between "Polish sausage" and "kielbasa." He asked for a photo of what we meant by the term "Polish sausage." I posted the following URL:

I also admitted that I had been wrong about Polish sausages being paler than other sausages, that I had confused them with some of the other types of sausage sold by Johnsonville.
Since that time I have been to several different supermarkets, and at each one I have taken a look at the sausage area of the meat section. I was surprised, first, to see that the term "kielbasa," by itself, was nowhere to be found. Most kielbasas were referred to as "polska kielbasa," such as in "Klements Smoked Polska Kielbasa." I found one use of "kielbasa" modified by the word "turkey": "Jennie-O Turkey Kielbasa."
"Healthy Choice Polska Kielbasa" was, unlike the others, which were presented in the shape of a U, presented in a package of two long sausages, at least as long as two ordinary Polish sausages such as those represented by the JPG image cited above. And one product, "Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa" contained sausages which were the same size as those Polish sausages. It may very well be, then, that the usual distinction in American English between "Polish sausage" and "(polska) kielbasa" is one used for marketing only, with the product itself being essentially the same.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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In a previous post to alt.english.usage , I wrote the following, inresponse to a poster who was writing from Poland: ... having been imported from Poland. For us, "Polish sausage" is a type of sausage, like "Italian sausage,"or "bratwurst," or "knockwurst."

I don't think that one can get away with that in the UK. If the Swiss Cheese is American, it'd have to say "American Swiss Cheese" on the pack.

(snip)
Since that time I have been to several different supermarkets, and at each one I have taken a look at ... such as in "Klements Smoked Polska Kielbasa." I found one use of "kielbasa" modifiedby the word "turkey": "Jennie-O Turkey Kielbasa."

Were those "polska kielbasa" made in the US too?
"Healthy Choice Polska Kielbasa" was, unlike the others, which were presented in the shape of a U, presented in a ... between "Polish sausage" and "(polska) kielbasa" is one used for marketing only, with the product itself being essentially the same.

Adrian
There's been a long discussion of this matter in alt.usage.english , in a post which was crossposted to soc.culture.europe and rec.travel.europe in which at least one poster appeared to be offended at Americans using "Swiss cheese" to mean a cheese not originating in Switzerland. He (and perhaps others in the thread) did not believe that any emmental or gruyere was sold in the UK which did not come from Switzerland or France. I learned, as a result of researching the matter for that thread, that legally, according to nomenclature rules of the Food and Drug Administration, "swiss cheese" and "emmentaler cheese" are the exact same product.

So legally, we Americans could call Swiss cheese made in America by the name "emmentaler," we just don't. Gruyere is a slightly different product, which can be substituted for Swiss cheese in certain products and still fall with rules of the FDA and the US Department of Agriculture.
More interesting to me than the question of "American Swiss Cheese" being sold in the UK is "American cheese" being sold in the UK, that is, pasteurized process American cheese, not necessarily cheese imported from America. From what I have read, I get the idea that you don't have process cheese slices on sale in British supermarkets, although I would think that McDonald's restaurants in the UK serve that cheese, although not necessarily with that name. It's a process cheese made from cheddar, called also a "processed cheese," although the other term is older and "processed cheese" is likely the result of hypercorrection.
Date: 2004-06-18 12:38:22 PST
(snip)

Since that time I have been to several different supermarkets, ... first, to see that the term "kielbasa," by itself, wasnowhere

to

be found. Most kielbasas were referred to as "polska kielbasa," such asin "Klements Smoked Polska Kielbasa." I found one use of "kielbasa"modified

by

the word "turkey": "Jennie-O Turkey Kielbasa."

Were those "polska kielbasa" made in the US too?

I would be amazed if even one of the brands was imported. If there were any sausages in those supermarkets which were imported from Poland, I would expect them to be in the deli section of the store (although I have seen butter from Normandy sold in the dairy department of one store, and butter from Denmark sold in the dairy department of another).

Produce is another matter. It is not unusual nowadays to see such things as apples or grapes imported from Chili and orange juice concentrate which came (in part, anyway) from Brazil. And large general supermarkets are now competing with ethnic supermarkets, putting in whole sections devoted to food favored by Asian and Hispanic consumers.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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More interesting to me than the question of "American Swiss Cheese" being sold in the UK is "American cheese" being ... called also a "processed cheese," although the other term is older and "processed cheese" is likely the result of hypercorrection.

We do - but it's not known as (or considered) "American cheese", it's labelled and sold as "processed cheese" (sic). As in the US, it usually comes as a pack of individually-wrapped square slices, to fit sliced bread for sandwiches.

Katy Jennison
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Were those "polska kielbasa" made in the US too?

I would be amazed if even one of the brands was imported. If there were any sausages in those supermarkets ... Normandy sold in the dairy department of one store, and butter from Denmark sold in the dairy department of another).

You haven't tasted really good butter until you have tasted butter from Latvia. It used to be exported to many European countries and even the USA, and Latvia was well known for it in the '30s. I don't know if it is again available ouside of Latvia.
The latest thing that Latvia is trying to introduce to the world is cannabis butter. I have eaten a lot of it in my childhood, and it is delicious. Don't anybody get excited it's not the same as smoking or eating the leaves. It is a product of the seeds, and they are not narcotic.

http://www.cannabis.net/articles/cannabis-butter.html

Skitt (AUE's token Latvian)
That seems more reasonable. But in the US there are a number of common food items whose ordinary names include a nationality "swiss cheese" (essentially ementhaler) and "polish sausage" being among the most common. Few people here know any other name for these products (I happen to know the name "ementhaler" from living in Switzerland for two years as a child).
There is a requirement for clear origin labeling on most packaged food (at least anything shipped interstate), so nobody is going to be confused that the "Swiss cheese" they bought came from Switzerland.

Then there are "french fries", with even less justification for the name.
We also allow companies to call themselves things like "federal security", which I also think is a bad idea. Although by now it's been going on long enough I doubt anybody is fooled.
David Dyer-Bennet, , RKBA: Pics: Dragaera/Steven Brust:
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You haven't tasted really good butter until you have tasted butter from Latvia. It used to be exported to many ... Latvia was well known for it in the '30s. I don't know if it is again available ouside of Latvia.

Many moons ago, when I travelled to and from Europe on the S.S. France, they served us a different unsalted butter each day (with table cards telling us about it). The one thing I was clear on is that adding some salt helped a lot made it edible, in fact.
The latest thing that Latvia is trying to introduce to the world is cannabis butter. I have eaten a lot ... the same as smoking or eating the leaves. It is a product of the seeds, and they are not narcotic.

Neither is any other part of the plant.
http://www.cannabis.net/articles/cannabis-butter.html

(Mind you, I'm in favor, on principle; I'm just quibbling about nomenclature, which seems on-topic for this group.)
David Dyer-Bennet, , RKBA: Pics: Dragaera/Steven Brust:
I thought about that, but that's what the site said, and I didn't instantly come up with a better word to describe the effects of a good toke or ten. Or was it that you are commenting on the particular plants grown up there, in the cold cruel north, where they don't have any pleasurable-effect-producing stuff hidden in any parts of them?

From the article, I understood that even seeds from our Mendocino crop could yield harmless cannabis butter.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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Since that time I have been to several different supermarkets, and at each one I have taken a look at ... as in "Klements Smoked Polska Kielbasa." I found one use of "kielbasa" modified by the word "turkey": "Jennie-O Turkey Kielbasa."

I haven't tried Jennie-O Turkey Kielbasa, but Turkey Kielbasa is generally known for the unique spices used which were gathered from all corners of the Ottoman empire.
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