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Will someone be kind enough to help me analyse the following, please?

1. He got himself into trouble. (SVA or SVOA?)

2. He got through the window. (SVA ?)

3. I am exhausted / angry / busy. (SVC or SVA?)

4. They look sick. (SVC or SVA?)

5. I have to do something. (SVO)

6. I have something to do. (SVOC or SVOA?)

7. The duty of a student is to study. (A student's duty is to study.) (SVA?)

Many thanks in advance!
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Comments  
1. SVOA
2. SVA
3. SV+predicate adjective.
4. SVA
5. SVO
6.SVOC
7. The duty of a student = S, is = V, to study is an infinitive phrase = object.
Many thanks for your quick reply. But I have some more questions based on your reply:

1. He got himself into trouble. (SVOA)

I thought since ‘he’ and ‘himself’ refer to the same person, there is no need to put ‘himself’ into the ‘O’ category?

3. I am exhausted / angry / busy.

4. They look sick. (SVA?)

If the sentences in (3) are SV + Adjective, why is ‘They look sick’ = SVA? Doesn’t this sentence mean: ‘They are sick’ ?

6. I have something to do. (SVOC?)

Could you please explain why ‘to do’ is considered a complement and not an adverbial?

7. The duty of a student = S, is = V, to study is an infinitive phrase = object.

Question: do you mean all infinitive phrases can be classified as the object in all similar sentence structures? e.g. The objective of my plan is to succeed.

Thanks again!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
They look sick. The verb modifier tells us how they look like.
I am angry. Here, "angry" modifies the subject (I), the noun; therefore, "angry" is an adjective.

I have to do something = I have something to do. SVO on second thought.

7. No sentence crosses my mind where the infinitive phrase is not an object. The objective of my plan is to succeed. To succeed is the object here.
Some linguists say "to succeed" is an adjective here.

He got himself into trouble = SVMA M = subject modifier, but I am not sure.
He got into trouble = SVA
Does anybody else have some comments?

Hi,

1. He got himself into trouble. (SVOA)

I thought since ‘he’ and ‘himself’ refer to the same person, there is no need to put ‘himself’ into the ‘O’ category? They refer to the same person, however from two different point of views.

In a sentence like 'He covered himself in mud to avoid the infrared sensors.' it is much more plain to see that 'himself' is the object of the sentence and doesn't necessarily function as an appositive.

3. I am exhausted / angry / busy. Subject-linking verb-predicate adjective.

4. They look sick. (SVA?) Subject linking verb- predicate adjective.

If the sentences in (3) are SV + Adjective, why is ‘They look sick’ = SVA? Doesn’t this sentence mean: ‘They are sick’ ?

They are sick and They look sick seem to have very similar meanings, and it looks like they have the same structure too but they don't express the same event.

6. I have something to do. (SVOC?)

Could you please explain why ‘to do’ is considered a complement and not an adverbial?

7. The duty of a student = S, is = V, to study is an infinitive phrase = object.

Question: do you mean all infinitive phrases can be classified as the object in all similar sentence structures? e.g. The objective of my plan is to succeed. In all similar structures, 'yes' Regards.
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Thanks a lot !
4. They look sick. (SVA?) "Subject linking verb- predicate adjective." Yes indeed

"look" is a copula, thus sick is not an adverb.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/internet-grammar/adjectiv/attribut.htm
Can you please give me some examples of a Subject-Linking Verb-Predicate Adjective . Please please please.[Y]Emotion: winkEmotion: geeked
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