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I have noticed that words of the same spelling change their meaning depending on the way one pronounces them. As well I know, in most cases an applied stress defines whether a word is recognised as a verb or a noun. The exception to that rule is the word 'address'. In this case pronunciation in verbal and noun meaning is exactly the same (at least if one considers the British English). Could anyone state another words (a comprehensive list) which behave the same way?

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Do you want a list of words that do change their stress, or words that don't? Your question kind of reads as if you mean the latter, but I suppose you probably mean the former. If so, see https://jakubmarian.com/english-words-that-change-meaning-depending-on-the-stress-position/

lukandThe exception to that rule is the word 'address'.

This reads as if there is only one exception, which of course is most definitely not the case.

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GPY's link seems to have a more complete list than the one I came up with some years ago, but you might want to take a look anyway.

The accent problem of two-syllabled-words

CJ

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My objective is to find a list of words of the same stress regardless a verbal and noun meaning.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
lukand

My objective is to find a list of words of the same stress regardless a verbal and noun meaning.

Wouldn't that be every word in English that can be both a noun and a verb but isn't on the lists linked to above? Good luck with that!

The following have the same pronunciation as a verb or noun:


attack

balance

balloon

blossom

button

carom

cotton

collapse

couple

dally

dandy

dollop

dimple

dicker

eddy

fallout

fiddle

gallop

gerrymander

gully

hollow

jelly

riddle

rally

stifle

silver

scupper

sliver

topple

twitter

twinkle

teeter

wallop

whimper

whisper

yellow



There are many words like this. If you want a comprehensive list, this could be obtained readily by going through a "collegiate"-type English dictionary. These are about a thousand pages long, and could be gone through in less than a month. Starting at the letter A, go through the listings looking for double entries. These are often the verb and the noun form of a word. For example, in the letter T section, as you look through it you'll see:


tailgate, noun: a party out of the back of a car.

tailgate, verb: to follow another car too closely.


Then check the pronunciation to see if they are pronounced the same way.


And so forth.

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