We have a word in my language for the effect eating something sour has on the teeth. The only English term I know is "on edge". Is there a more specific term - even an obscure one?
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We have a word in my language for the effect eating something sour has on the teeth.

What would that be?
The only English term I know is "on edge". Is there a more specific term - even an obscure one?

In German we say something to the effect of "my teeth are being pulled together", as we bite into a slice of lemon, for instance.

Luca

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We have a word in my language for the effect eating something sour has on the teeth.

What would that be?

The language is not one you or anyone else here would have heard of. It's Mizo, one of the dozens of minority languages in India. The word is "tim", but with a dot under the t. This letter is the only one from our alphabet that's not in the English alphabet. It sounds almost like 'tr' but not quite. The t and r sounds are blended more closely than in 'tr'.
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What would that be?

The language is not one you or anyone else here would have heard of. It's Mizo, one of the dozens ... It sounds almost like 'tr' but not quite. The t and r sounds are blended more closely than in 'tr'.

I thought he was asking what is the effect that eating something sour has on the teeth. I am aware of no such effect.

The only effect of food on teeth of which I am aware is that fresh spinach leaves the teeth feeling as if they have a coating on them. Indeed, I had spinach for lunch (nicely sauteed in olive oil with lots of garlic) today and at 8:30 at night my teeth still feel like they have a coating on them.

John Varela
The language is not one you or anyone else here ... and r sounds are blended more closely than in 'tr'.

I thought he was asking what is the effect that eating something sour has on the teeth. I am aware of no such effect.

Yes, that's the way I understood the question too. It'd be interesting if it turned out that there was no word (or even concept) in English to describe the feeling on one's teeth from tasting something acidic, tart or astringent.
In Bulgarian, we have a term for the feeling - "скомина" ("skomina") - and a little search for the cognate Russian - "оскомина" ("oskomina") turned up the following page:
http://www.logolalia.com/untranslatable/archives/001673.html

Apparently, there really is no single English word for the concept.
The only effect of food on teeth of which I am aware is that fresh spinach leaves the teeth feeling ... lots of garlic) today and at 8:30 at night my teeth still feel like they have a coating on them.

But what you describe is not a feeling that the teeth have; it is a feeling that the tongue has as to what is /on/ the teeth. Whereas, what the /teeth/ feel, when biting, into let's say, rhubarb, or lime, is a very specific sensation; one could describe it, I guess, as "pulling the teeth together".

You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.
@news.albasani.net:
We have a word in my language for the effect eating something sour has on the teeth. The only English term I know is "on edge". Is there a more specific term - even an obscure one?

To fur, is the closest I can think of. A furring of the teeth.

Peter
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I thought he was asking what is the effect that eating something sour has on the teeth. I am aware ... lots of garlic) today and at 8:30 at night my teeth still feel like they have a coating on them.

Spinach, even raw spinach, makes my teeth feel when rubbing together the way my hands would feel when still wet after a very good scrubbing with detergent that has removed all traces of sebum. Yes, it makes my teeth feel like they've been washed in Lava hand soap.
I don't think spinach adds a coating. I think the spinach does something chemically in the mouth that makes the saliva less slippery. Our teeth then don't feel like they're lubricated. But according to this article, I'm wrong. It /is/ a coating:
http://www.fitsugar.com/What-Causes-Spinach-Teeth-551249
Isn't it ironic that spinach, which is high in iron, also has the oxalic acid which is said to prevent your body from absorbing iron. I wonder if in the evolutionary process involving man and spinach, somewhere in the cycle of man eating spinach, then pooping it out to fertilize more spinach, has created some kind of biofeedback that let the spinach know that iron isn't good for man. So the spinach, in its attempts to protect man, maybe created its own oxalic acid to keep too much of its iron from becoming part of man.

After all, we wouldn't want to find ourselves flying around our locality whenever someone turns on a powerful electromagnet, would we? It might not feel good to suddenly have all the iron sucked out of our bodies. I've read that people who wear those silly magnetic rings sometimes turn "gray" where they were wearing the rings, like the iron that was flowing through them hung around near the magnets. If that's the case, perhaps having magnets installed around your kidneys would help suck all the iron toward your bladder to be eliminated.
Damaeus
Isn't it ironic that spinach, which is high in iron, also has the oxalic acid which is said to prevent your body from absorbing iron.

The allegedly high quantity of iron in spinach is a myth see here, for example:

As a child, I often heard the expression "takes the skin off your teeth" used to describe the effect of rhubarb and similarly nasty things.

Les (BrE)
Reading from
Isn't it ironic that spinach, which is high in iron, also has the oxalic acid which is said to prevent your body from absorbing iron.

The allegedly high quantity of iron in spinach is a myth see here, for example:

Interesting when the newsreader one uses affects how hyperlinks are posted. Maybe the newsreaders that wrap posted hyperlinks are in cahoots with tinyurl.com for revenue.
About the spinach, I had not heard that about the iron content. Thanks for the info. Emotion: smile
Damaeus
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