What would be a good synonym for "star-shaped" in a non-astronomical technical context ? Asteroform ?
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What would be a good synonym for "star-shaped" in a non-astronomical technical context ? Asteroform ?

I'd say "stellate".
Stellate! STELLATE!!
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Stellate! STELLATE!!

I'd love to. How do you do it?

Bob Lieblich
Nothing snipped
What would be a good synonym for "star-shaped" in a non-astronomical technical context ? Asteroform ?

'Asteroid' is, in addition to being a well-know noun, usable as an adjective meaning 'like a star,' according to a Webster's dictionary.

The main question your question raises is, what does 'star-shaped' mean? Many people would take it to mean the five-pointed figure that's commonly, but not reasonably, thought of as like a star, but a star is to the naked eye simply a point of light in the sky, while to a telescope it can take on any number of bizarre shapes depending upon where it is in its life cycle.
Bottom line is, 'star-shaped' has no useful intrinsic meaning. For the layman, without telescopic aid, stars have no discernible shape beyond the 'shape' of a point.
What do you mean by 'star-shaped'?

Egbert White, > "I love Americans, but not when they try Planet Earth > to talk French. What a blessing it is that
What would be a good synonym for "star-shaped" in a non-astronomical technical context ? Asteroform ?

'Asteroid' is, in addition to being a well-know noun, usable as an adjective meaning 'like a star,' according to a ... without telescopic aid, stars have no discernible shape beyond the 'shape' of a point. What do you mean by 'star-shaped'?

I think it's very clear. If the OP was referring to the shape of the "point of light in the sky", the question would be "What is the shape of a star?". It's quite obvious that the OP is asking what another word is for the shape that we draw and call a "star".

The term "star-shaped" was not isolated. It was in context. There is meaning, and clearly understandable meaning.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
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What would be a good synonym for "star-shaped" in a non-astronomical technical context ? Asteroform ?

I'll chime in for "stellate", while noting "stelliform" as another option. But if you prefer the Greek root and don't like "asteroid" don't take half-measures: I think "astromorphic" would be what you're after.

Odysseus
'Asteroid' is, in addition to being a well-know noun, usable ... 'shape' of a point. What do you mean by 'star-shaped'?

I think it's very clear. If the OP was referring to the shape of the "point of light in the ... obvious that the OP is asking what another word is for the shape that we draw and call a "star".

That's all very well, but we don't all draw the same shape, do we?
The term "star-shaped" was not isolated. It was in context. There is meaning, and clearly understandable meaning.

It's perfectly understandable, sure. It means the shape that the poster is thinking of when he draws something to represent a star. Trouble is, he hasn't said what shape he is going to draw.
Oh, sorry, of course he did. Star-shaped. One of these, no doubt:

What they seem to have in common is that (in plan view) they are rotationally symmetrical polygons with at least three reflex corners, or rounded derivatives of such shapes. Will that do? It excludes the simple asterisk, though. The shape most frequently called star-shaped is the pentangle, or a bloated derivative of it:

Paul
Even our own sun is 5-pointed, but in that case, we can't tell because the sun is so bright. Next time there is a full eclipse, check out the 5 little points peeking out from behind the moon.

The combination of latitude and climate means that I have never witnessed a full eclipse and I'm unlikely to.
What you say is interesting anyway. But doesn't the number of visible points of the sun vary according to the direction you're looking at it from?

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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