Hi.
I'm new to this group. I would like to say that over in ok.general they're explaining things like a recent subject heading

My monthly tear(rhymes with wear)
I'm assuming the person over there who was explaining that tear rhymes with wear
thinks we're all too stupid to understand that tear rhymes with wear. When I asked what they thought we were going to think tear rhymed with they gave the following explanation
It's 2 words, both spelled the same. Could rhyme with either beer or bear.
Make sense now?
Now I know that tear rhymes with wear. Sometimes. Sometimes if it's tear it rhymes with we're. I thought if two words were spelled the same but had different meanings that they were homonyms.

I'm not sure why someone would think I would think they would have a monthly tear(rhymes with beer...beer being their example.) I would always think it was a monthy tear(rhyming with bear, again their example.) Unless of course they always had a good cry monthly. Like in the song,
My tears are falling
cause you've taken her away
And though it really hurts me so(sew)
there's something that I've gotta
say
(can't remember the whole first stanza)
Take good care of my baby
Now don't you ever make her cry
Just tell her that you love her
Make sure you're thinking of her
Don't let her see a cloudy sky
Once upon a time(thyme)
that little girl was mine
if I'd been true
I(eye) knowEmotion: no she'd never be with you
So take good care of my baby
Be(bee) just as kind as you can be(bee)
And if you should discover
that you don't really love her
Just send my baby back home
to(two, too)
me
I also know the words to the song about there's a tear in my beer.

If you could help with this in any way I would really appreciate it.

Specifically is this a homonym type situation?
1 2 3 4 5 6
Hi. I'm new to this group. I would like to say that over in ok.general they're explaining things like a ... tear(rhyming with bear, again their example.) Unless of course they always had a good cry monthly. Like in the song,

Ah, I see you've answered your own question.
Adrian
If you could help with this in any way I would really appreciate it. Specifically is this a homonym type situation?

Strictly speaking, homonyms are two different words with the same spelling and pronunciation. "Ounce" the unit of weight and "ounce" the snow leopard are homonyms two undrelated words, same spelling, same pronunciation. "Lead" the metal and "lead" the verb are not homonyms they are pronounced differently. But they are* homographs spelled the same. Conversely: "right" and "write" are not honomyns they have different spellings. But they *are homophones same pronunciation. It follows that "tear" the verb meaning "rip" and "tear" the noun meaning a drop of liquid from the eye are homographs.
Of course, life being life and English being English, the tidy schema set forth in the preceding paragraph is not always adhered to. Many people use "homonym" to mean "homophone." Most people don't even know what a "homograph" is. Still others think anyone using such words is talking dirty. It's a jungle out there.

I snipped the long discussion and poem following. If you know what the terms mean, you should be able to figure out the rest for yourself.

Bob Lieblich
Homo sapiens
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If you could help with this in any way I would really appreciate it. Specifically is this a homonym type situation?

Strictly speaking, homonyms are two different words with the same spelling and pronunciation. "Ounce" the unit of weight and "ounce" the snow leopard are homonyms two undrelated words, same spelling, same pronunciation. "Lead" the metal and "lead" the verb

How does "strictly speaking" apply here, however? Go to Google and put in

define:homonym
and you'll get all sorts of definitions for the term.

*The Century Dictionary,* under its entry for "homonym," has, besides the definition from philology given here, some terms which turn up nowhere else on the Internet:
(quote)
homonym 2. In philol., a word which agrees with another in sound, and perhaps in spelling, but is not the same in meaning

Arbitrary homonym, a name arbitrarily borrowed from one thing to be applied to another, as brougham for a kind of coach. Casual homonym, a word accidentally hav- ing the same sound as another. Tropical homonym, a word used by a figure of speech in an essentially changed meaning. Thus, the horn of a dilemma is a tropical ho- monym of the horn of an ox.
(end quote)
are not homonyms they are pronounced differently. But they are homographs spelled the same. Conversely: "right" and "write" ... what the terms mean, you should be able to figure out the rest for yourself. Bob Lieblich Homo sapiens

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Hi. I'm new to this group. I would like to say that over in ok.general they're explaining things like a ... you could help with this in any way I would really appreciate it. Specifically is this a homonym type situation?

I think several tears at least monthly is a good thing clears the sinuses, gets rid of all that repressed sadness, makes you feel a lot better.
Carter
Carter Jefferson
http://carterj.homestead.com /
In alt.english.usage on 2 Feb 2004 18:14:47 -0800
Hi. I'm new to this group. I would like to say that over in ok.general they're explaining things like a ... why someone would think I would think they would have a monthly tear(rhymes with beer...beer being their example.) I would

He didn't say that what he thinks you would think. Nor do you need to be sure why he would think something.
He's being clear about what he's saying, so you don't have to waste your time trying to figure it out. Stop complaining.
always think it was a monthy tear(rhyming with bear, again their example.) Unless of course they always had a good ... you could help with this in any way I would really appreciate it. Specifically is this a homonym type situation?

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
Born west of Pittsburgh Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis, 7 years
Chicago, 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
Baltimore 20 years
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Hi. I'm new to this group. I would like to say that over in ok.general they're explaining things like a ... you could help with this in any way I would really appreciate it. Specifically is this a homonym type situation?

Yes.
Ah, I see you've answered your own question. Adrian

Yes I ask and answer all my own questions now.
Sometimes they let me out during the day to swing
back and forth back and forth. But only if I've been behaving myself.
I looked up heteronym and holograph and when I found myself sitting there almost getting the difference I went...Wait a minute...stop stop stop...
As much as I would love to figure it/that out
I'm afraid I'm not the candidate for that as I
still haven't figured out what Mrs. Robinson's foot means.

Thank you so much for your time and attention to this matter.
Specifically is this a homonym type situation?

Yes.

I see.
And what are beer and bare?
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